Past Events and Programs

 

  • Amy Pleasant's work "Reclining Figures I," created in 2021, ink and gouache on paper. The piece shows a headless torso in black with white nipple dots.

    Amy Pleasant Artist Lecture

    Wednesday, November 10, 2021 | 7:00 pm

    Windgate Artist in Resident Amy Pleasant presented a lecture in the Ruth Zuckerman Pavilion at the Zuckerman Museum of Art on Thursday, November 10, at 7:00 pm. The lecture offered in-person and virtual visitors the opportunity to learn more about Pleasant's artistic process and residency at KSU's School of Art and Design. Amy Pleasant's work includes painting, drawing, and ceramic sculpture, exploring the body and language through repetition.

    Windgate Foundation was established in 1993 and is a private, family foundation based in Little Rock, Arkansas. Windgate's goal is to advance contemporary craft and strengthen visual arts education in the United States. The foundation also supports children and youth in the State of Arkansas.        

    Featured work: Amy Pleasant, Reclining Figures I, 2021, ink and gouache on paper. Image courtesy of the artist.
    • Amy Pleasant received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1994) and an MFA from the Tyler School of Art, Temple University (1999).

      She has held solo exhibitions at Geary Contemporary (NYC/Millerton, NY), Laney Contemporary (Savannah, GA), Institute 193 (Lexington, KY), Jeff Bailey Gallery (Hudson/NYC), whitespace gallery (Atlanta, GA), Augusta University (Columbus, GA), Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art (IN), Birmingham Museum of Art (AL), Atlanta Contemporary (GA), Auburn University’s School of Liberal Arts (AL), Rhodes College (Memphis, TN),  Candyland (Stockholm, Sweden), and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (AL) among others.

      Group shows include Brackett Creek Exhibitions (Bozeman, MT), Hesse Flatow (NYC), SEPTEMBER (Hudson, NY), Mindy Solomon Gallery (Miami, FL), Tif Sigfrids (Athens, GA),  Hemphill Fine Arts (Washington, D.C.), Adams and Ollman (Portland, OR), Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (AL), Cuevas Tilleard Projects (NYC), The Dodd Galleries (Athens, GA), Zuckerman Museum of Art (GA), Knoxville Museum of Art (TN), Weatherspoon Museum of Art (NC), Hunter Museum of American Art (Chattanooga, TN), Columbus Museum of Art (GA), National Museum of Women in the Arts (D.C.), The Mobile Museum of Art (AL), and the U.S. Embassy, Prague, Czech Republic.

      Her work has been reviewed in publications such as World Sculpture News, Sculpture, The Brooklyn Rail, Art in America, Artforum, Art Papers, Bad at Sports and BURNAWAY.

      Awards include a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship (2018), South Arts Prize for the State of Alabama (2018), Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Award (2015), Mary Hambidge Distinguished Artist Award (2015), Cultural Alliance of Birmingham Individual Artist Fellowship (2008), and Alabama State Council on the Arts Individual Artist Fellowship (2019/2003).

      Her first monograph, The Messenger’s Mouth Was Heavy, was released in 2019, co-published by Institute 193 and Frank. 

      Pleasant also co-founded the curatorial initiative The Fuel And Lumber Company with artist Pete Schulte in 2013.

      Her work has been reviewed in many publications including Art in America, Art Papers, Artforum, The Brooklyn Rail and Sculpture.

     

    • Photo of printed work by Louise Bourgeois from her Topiary series depicting a body with amputated limbs.

      Virtual Lecture and Discussion on The Print Work of Louise Bourgeois: Content and Process

      Wednesday, November 3, 2021 | 7:00 pm 

      The Zuckerman Museum of Art presented a virtual Lecture and discussion on the print work of Louise Bourgeois with Felix Harlan and Sewon Kang on Wednesday, November 3, 2021. Felix Harlan, master printer, proprietor of the printshop Harlan & Weaver, and friend and collaborator of renowned artist Louise Bourgeois will join Sewon Kang, archivist at The Easton Foundation and Louise Bourgeois Archive, for a discussion on the prints included in the exhibition The Labor of Remembrance Print and Textile Works by Louise Bourgeois as well as on the process of working with Bourgeois. 

      Sewon Kang is Archivist at The Easton Foundation, Louise Bourgeois’ home/studio, where she is responsible for the care of the artist’s diaries, papers, and small collection of prints and illustrated books. She previously worked in the Drawings and Prints department at MoMA, first on the online catalogue raisonné of Bourgeois’ printed oeuvre, and then on the 2017 print retrospective and book,  An Unfolding Portrait. Sewon also researched other areas of MoMA’s collection for new acquisition initiatives, publications, and the reinstallation of the expanded museum. She is a graduate of Wesleyan University and a part-time Masters student at Hunter College. 

      Featured image: 
      Louise Bourgeois 
      TOPIARY, THE ART OF IMPROVING NATURE (detail, plate 6), 1998 
      Portfolio of nine drypoint and aquatint etchings on paper. Each: 39 1/4 x 27 3/4"; 99.7 x 70.5 cm.  
      Photo: Christopher Burke, © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY 
      • Recording coming soon

    • Photo of Steve Miller

      Do Deathbed Experiences Provide Evidence for an Afterlife?

      A Presentation by J. Steve Miller, Ph.D.

      Monday, November 1, 2021 | 1:30 pm 

      The thesis of this lecture/Q&A was quite simple and intuitive: If you want to look for evidence for the afterlife, observe the dying, to see if there’s any indication that they’re going somewhere. Researchers are finding that several experiences related to death are global and quite common, including:

      • Near-Death Experiences, where many resuscitated from clinical death report vivid out-of-body experiences
      • Deathbed Experiences, where over 80% of the dying in a hospice unit report vivid experiences with deceased relatives and angels
      • Terminal Lucidity, where people lose brain function over time, only to regain full consciousness to say their goodbyes before dying
      • Shared Death Experiences, where healthy people experience a part of their loved one’s death experience
      • Crisis Apparitions, where people otherwise unaware of a person’s death somehow know of the person’s death
      • After Death Communications, where people claim to receive visits from deceased loved ones


      To discover if these can be explained away as lies, exaggerations, or hallucinations, highly respected intellects, connected to many of our top universities, have studied phenomena at death for significant portions of their lives and assessed them for afterlife evidence. In this onsite lecture, Dr. Miller argued that the current state of the evidence points toward the afterlife. 

       

      • “The range and depth of this work is breathtaking….”

        - Douglas Winslow Cooper, Ph.D., Formerly, Associate Professor of Environmental Physics, Harvard University

        “…the best book on deathbed experiences anywhere.”

        - Jeffrey Long, M.D., Cofounder of the Near-Death Experience Research Foundation

        “…extremely powerful in making the case for life after death….”

        - J. P. Moreland, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Biola University

        “Anyone interested in solid evidence for the reality of the spiritual realm should read this book.”

        - Michael Sabom, M.D., Former Assistant Professor of Cardiology, Emory School of Medicine

        “…one of the most startling, challenging treatises it has been my privilege to read in recent years.”

        - David Cashin, Ph.D., Professor of Intercultural Studies, Columbia International University

      • Dr. Miller has won numerous awards for his teaching and books. He teaches courses on Death & Dying and Religious Studies, with an emphasis on critical thinking, in the Interdisciplinary Studies department at Kennesaw State University. For the past 25 years, he’s spent extensive time caring for elderly and infirm relatives, including his grandmother, who celebrated her 110th birthday before passing away peacefully at home.

       

      • Recording coming soon

    • Photo of students standing in gallery discussing art

      Virtual Panel Discussion and Presentation: Art, Empathy, and Wellness 

      Thursday, October 28, 2021 | 7:00 pm

      The Zuckerman Museum of Art presented a panel of presentations on interdisciplinary work between health care, museum practice, and education in visual art. Marcia Day Childress, Ph.D., Professor Emerita of Medical Education and Harrison Distinguished Teaching Professor Emerita, Center for Health Humanities and Ethics at University of Virginia School of Medicine and M. Jordan Love, Ph.D., Carol R. Angle Academic Curator at The Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia presented joint ventures of the UVA School of Medicine’s Center for Health Humanities and Ethics and UVA’s Fralin Museum of Art. Viewers learned about their partnership, Clinician’s Eye, an interactive workshop using visual art analysis to improve core clinical skills of observation, communication, collaboration, compassion, and reflection. The program and its specific teaching methodologies, content, and additional tangential programs such as “HeArt of Medicine” relate significantly to the themes presented in the museum's fall exhibition series, especially in consideration of the museum/art as a facilitator. The discussion was supported by additional comments from April Munson, Ph.D., Professor of Art Education, KSU School of Art and Design, regarding connections to wellness in the field of Art Education. 

       

      • Recording coming soon

    • Photo of Skip Rizzo on the right, holding a skull with a VR Headset on

      Clinical Virtual Reality: From Combat to COVID

      Thursday, October 21, 2021 | 7:00 pm 

      In association with the Fall 2021 exhibitions, This Mortal Coil and The Labor of Remembrance, the Zuckerman Museum of Art presented a free virtual lecture, Clinical Virtual Reality: From Combat to COVID, with Skip Rizzo, Ph.D., Director, Medical Virtual Reality - Institute for Creative Technologies, Research Professor - Dept. of Psychiatry and School of Gerontology, University of Southern California.

      Psychologist Skip Rizzo conducts research on the design, development, and evaluation of virtual reality (VR) systems targeting the areas of clinical assessment, treatment rehabilitation, and resilience. The physical, emotional, cognitive, and psychological demands of war place enormous stress on even the best-prepared military personnel. This talk will present an overview of research, development, and implementation of Clinical Virtual Reality applications that have been applied in the prevention, assessment, treatment, and scientific understanding of the psychological wounds of war. The talk will then present the expansion of the work from combat-related PTSD, to military sexual trauma, and conclude with a discussion of the approach for wider civilian trauma needs, including COVID-related mental health concerns and issues around loss, death, and dying.

       

      • Recording coming soon 

     

    • Janine Antoni, "to long," 2015, Polyurethane resin, © Janine Antoni; Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.

      Janine Antoni Artist Lecture

      Thursday, October 7, 2021 | 7:00 pm

      The Zuckerman Museum of Art presented a 1-hour virtual lecture with exhibiting artist Janine Antoni in association with the fall exhibition, This Mortal Coil

      Featured image: Janine Antoni, to long, 2015, Polyurethane resin
      © Janine Antoni; Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York.
      • Janine Antoni is a visual artist who was born in Freeport, Bahamas, in 1964. She received a BA from Sarah Lawrence College and an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. She is known for her unusual processes. Her body is both her tool for making and the source from which her meaning arises. Antoni's early work transformed materials like chocolate and soap and used everyday activities like bathing, eating, and sleeping as sculptural processes. She carefully articulates her relationship to the world, giving rise to emotional states that are felt in and through the senses. In each piece, no matter the medium or image, a conveyed physicality speaks directly to the viewer's body.


        Antoni has shown nationally and internationally and is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship (1998), John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Award (2011), and Anonymous Was A Woman Award (2014). Antoni currently resides in New York and is represented by Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York, and Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco.


        Her artwork is currently on view in "Hand in Hand" at Bienvenu Steinberg & Partner, New York, NY, "This Mortal Coil" at the Zuckerman Museum of Art, Kennesaw, GA, "New Time: Art and Feminisms in the 21st Century" at the Berkeley Art Museum, Berkeley, CA, "The Eyes Have It" at Lehman College Art Gallery, Bronx, NY, the permanent collection in the Gorelik Gallery of the Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA, and the permanent collection of the National Museum of Contemporary Art (EMST) in Athens, Greece.

       

      • Installation view of works featured in "This Mortal Coil"

        Interchange 2021

        Thursday, September 30, 2021 | 7:30 pm 

        Interchange is an annual collaboration across all disciplines in the College of the Arts. It celebrates the spark that all the creative arts enkindle in one another. The Interchange 2021 program was presented virtually and in person to a small audience. It featured seven ArtsKSU faculty members performing in response to the museum's fall exhibition series, This Mortal Coil and The Labor Remembrance Print and Textile Works by Louise Bourgeois. Learn more about the fall exhibition series here


        Interchange 2021 Performers:

         

        • Video recording coming soon

      • Ruth Zuckerman figurative sculpture

        Celebration of Stone Carving

        Thursday, September 23, 2021 | 11:00 am - 2:00 pm

        Location: Campus Green in front of the Student Center, Kennesaw Campus

        The Zuckerman Museum of Art was pleased to present a mini festival celebrating the art of stone carving on Ruth Zuckerman’s birthday. The festival was located on KSU's Campus Green and offered participants an opportunity to learn about the origins of stone carving in Ancient Greece and how those tools and techniques are still used by sculptors today. Visitors also got to try their hand at chiseling a real piece of marble and carve their own small sculpture in plaster. This program was presented in conjunction with KSU’s Annual Country Study Program, Year of Greece.

         

        Colorful Blue logo for KSU's Year of Greece Porgram

      • Image of artist Tony Orrico during a performance of "8Circles" laying face down with his arms extended as he draws circles with graphite on a large sheet of paper underneath him.

        Tony Orrico Artist Talk

        Thursday, September 9, 2021 | 7:00 pm 

        Exhibiting Project Wall artist Tony Orrico presented a virtual lecture about his work.  

        Featured image: Tony Orrico performing 8 Circles. Photo by Michael Hart
        • Tony Orrico is a visual and performance artist, choreographer, and dancer. Merging the act of drawing with choreographic gesture and bio-geometrics, his work has reached mass circulation for its ingenuity within the intersections of performance and drawing. His work explores how consciousness and physical impulses manifest into visible forms. He often uses his own somatic research, Suspension Practice, as point of entry into his visual work. Orrico has performed/exhibited his work across the US and internationally in Australia, Belgium, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Mexico, The Netherlands, Poland, and Spain. His visual work is in collection at of The National Academy of Sciences (Washington DC) and Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporáneo (MUAC, Mexico City) as well as prominent private collections such as Grazyna Kulczyk, Kablanc/Fundación Otazu and Bergmeier/Kunstsaele, among others. He has presented at the CCCB, Centre Pompidou-Metz, The New Museum, Cranbrook Art Museum and Poptech 2011: The World Rebalancing. Orrico was one of a select group of artists to re-perform the work of Marina Abramovic during her retrospective at MoMA (2010). As a former member of Trisha Brown Dance Company and Shen Wei Dance Arts, Orrico has graced such stages as the Sydney Opera House, Teatro La Fenice, New York State Theater, and Theatre du Palais-Royal.  

         

      • Photo of Art Historian and catalog essayist, Jenni Sorkin

        Visiting Scholar Lecture: Jenni Sorkin

        September 1, 2021 | 7:00 pm via Zoom 

        The ZMA presented a 1-hour virtual lecture with scholar and catalog essayist Jenni Sorkin in association with the exhibitions, This Mortal Coil and The Labor of Remembrance

        • Jenni Sorkin is Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is best known for her writing in art criticism highlighting work by feminist artists and artists working in fiber and associated crafts, as well as on the intersections between gender, material culture, and contemporary art. Her publications include Live Form: Women, Ceramics and Community (2016), Revolution in the Making: Abstract Sculpture by Women Artists, 1947–2016 (2016), Art in California (2021), and numerous essays in journals and exhibition catalogs. She was educated at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Bard College, and received her PhD from Yale University. She is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Modern Craft.

         

        • Image of the Zuckerman Museum of Art's exterior facade at night.

          ZMA Summer After Hours

          Thursday, July 15, 2021 | 5:00 - 9:00 PM


          The Zuckerman Museum of Art was pleased to offer an after hours opportunity to connect with the art and ideas on view in the museum's spaces. Curator Cynthia Nourse Thompson provided a curatorial tour of the exhibition The Hand Print Workshop: Process & Innovation at 7:00 pm. 


          In addition, visitors to ZMA After Hours had the opportunity to get a free Year of Greece t-shirt courtesy of KSU's Annual Country Study Program, Year of Greece and create a one-of-a-kind silkscreen print utilizing imagery from the Year of Greece design featured below. 

           

          Logo for KSU's Year of Greece Program

          • Photo of Skopelos Foundation for the Arts sign in Greece.

            Skopelos Foundation for the Arts: A Site for artistic and cultural exchange

            Thursday, July 8, 2021 | 7:00 pm 

            In association with the Zuckerman Museum of Art’s exhibition Hand Print Workshop International: Process & Innovation, the Museum presents a virtual lecture by Georgia Deal and Nancy Zimler. Their presentation will focus on the lengthy history between the Skopelos Foundation for the Arts in Skopelos, Greece and the late Dennis O’Neil, founder and director of Hand Print Workshop International and professor at the Corcoran College of Art + Design.  O’Neil helped build and develop the printmaking studios at Skopelos, and then later with Corcoran colleagues, Steven Cushner, Georgia Deal and others, developed a robust study abroad program in screenprinting, painting, monoprinting, book arts, and photography. The additional goal of this academic program was to immerse students not only in the Island’s cultural and artistic offerings but that of the larger Greek culture by visiting Athens, Thessaloniki and surrounding islands. Dennis O’Neil created a rewarding experience for all who participated in this unique and special studio experience that ran until 2018 at the Skopelos Foundation for the Arts, under the auspices of the Corcoran as well as the Hand Print Workshop. This program is presented in conjunction with KSU’s Annual Country Study Program, Year of Greece.

            Logo for KSU's Year of Greece

             

          • Photo of KSU's Master Craftsman Program completed project for the Acworth Police Department.

            Last Wednesday Lunch

            May 26, 2021 | 12:30 - 1:00 pm

            The May 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch event was presented virtually and featured Page Burch, Lecturer of Sculpture and Coordinator of the Master Craftsman Program. Burch shared insight into the program's public art projects and the current Fine Arts Gallery retrospective exhibition, Master Craftsman: Classroom to Community

          • Featured image of SOAAD Professors: (clockwise from top left) Page Burch, Kristine Kim, Don Robson, and Chris Malone.

            Last Wednesday Lunch

            April 28, 2021 | 12:30  - 1:00 pm

            The spring 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch program featured faculty artists represented in the Spring 2021 School of Art and Design Faculty Exhibition. Each month several faculty members shared their perspectives on the creative work they practice. The event on April 28th presented prerecorded presentations by Page Burch, Kristine Kim, Chris Malone, and Don Robson

            Featured image of SOAAD Professors: (clockwise from top left) Page Burch, Kristine Kim, Don Robson, and Chris Malone. 
          • Photo of artist and KSU professor, Joseph Karg

            The Art of Comics: Inking with Joseph Karg

            • February 26, 2021 | 1:00 - 3:00 pm 
            • April 24, 2021 | 1:00 - 3:00 pm 

            In this free art of comics inking workshop series, Professor Joseph Karg demonstrated pro tips for utilizing tools and techniques to create diverse mark-making. In addition, Karg provided insight and instruction to help participants sharpen their focus and use inking tools of the comic book trade. 

            • Joseph Karg is an accomplished illustrator who specializes in the comic art, album covers, tour posters and design for animation. He has most notably worked on the Emmy award-winning show, Archer, for FX, and in 2016, he was voted Creative Loafing's Best Illustrator of Atlanta. His clients include MARVEL, FX, NETFLIX, AMC, Judd Apatow Productions and Viacom.

              When Joseph is not working on a commercial project, he spends his time teaching others and training himself in new disciplines. Since the summer of 2020, he’s joined KSU’s School of Art and Design as a tenure track assistant professor of animation and illustration.

              Joseph is currently working on his largest project to date: a four volume graphic novel series with the publisher Dark Planet.

            • Photo of the cover of the graphic novel "My Favorite Thing is Monsters" by Emil Ferris. The cover features a vibrant purple image of a female figure's face. The outline of a building is behind the female's face and a full moon is hanging in th upper left corner.

              Zuckerman Museum of Art + Interdisciplinary Studies Book Club

              April 15th, 2021 | 3:00 – 5:00 pm

              The Zuckerman Museum of Art and the KSU Interdisciplinary Studies Department co-sponsor an ongoing series of book discussions open to the campus community. A title is selected to serve as a springboard for discussion of important issues relevant to both groups. 

              The Spring 2021 book club met virtually on April 15, 2021, from 3:00 to 5:00 pm. The selected book was the graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters by Emil Ferris. This highly acclaimed work explores monstrousness in the human psyche. The graphic novel presents a convergence of the personal, the political, the past, and the present with full-color illustrations in ballpoint pen. Critic John Powers in his book review on NPR's Fresh Air, calls it "a dazzling, graphic novel tour-de-force." An original drawing from the graphic novel was featured in the Spring 2021 special exhibition, The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles, on view in the Don Russell Clayton Gallery from January 23 – May 8, 2021. 

              • Black and white image of the artist, Lesley Dill

                Lesley Dill Artist Lecture

                April 9, 2021 | 12:00 pm

                In celebration of April as National Poetry Month, The Zuckerman Museum of Art debuted a new program series highlighting the literary art form's cultural significance.

                On Friday, April 9, artist Lesley Dill presented an hour-long virtual artist lecture in conjunction with some Early Visionaries exhibition. The show featured drawings and collages by the artist and was on view in the ZMA's satellite Fine Arts Gallery from March 16 through April 10, 2021. 

                • Lesley Dill is an American artist working at the intersection of language and fine art in printmaking, sculpture, installation and performance, exploring the power of words to cloak and reveal the psyche. Dill transforms the emotions of the writings of Emily Dickinson, Salvador Espriu, Tom Sleigh, Franz Kafka, and Rainer Maria Rilke, among others, into works of paper, wire, horsehair, foil, bronze and music—works that awaken the viewer to the physical intimacy and power of language itself.

                  Dill has had over one hundred solo exhibitions. Her artworks are in the collections of many major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. In 2017 she was named a fellow of The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and is a Joan Mitchell Foundation Creating A Living Legacy artist and grant recipient.  Her opera, Divide Light, based on the poems of Emily Dickinson, was performed in San Jose in 2008. In April of 2018 the New Camerata Opera Company performed a re-staged version in New York City which was captured in a full-length film by Ed Robbins.

                  In November 2019, Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans presented a collection of her work titled Drawings: Some Early Visionary Americans. In 2021, the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa will stage her exhibit Wilderness: Light Sizzles Around Me, which amplifies voices of the North American past as they wrestle with divinity, deviltry, and freedom.

                  The artist is represented by Nohra Haime Gallery in New York and Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans.

                  Lesley Dill lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

                   

                 

                • Photo of upcoming March 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch artists: Jeff Campana, Sandee Chamberlain, Robert Sherer, and Deborah Hutchinson.

                  Last Wednesday Lunch

                  March 31, 2021 | 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

                  The spring 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch program featured faculty artists represented in the Spring 2021 School of Art and Design Faculty Exhibition. Each month several faculty members shared their perspectives on the creative work they practice. The event on March 31st presented prerecorded presentations by Jeff Campana, Sandee Chamberlain, Deborah Hutchinson, and Robert Sherer

                  Featured image of SOAAD Professors: (clockwise from top left) Jeff Campana, Sandee Chamberlain, Robert Sherer, and Deborah Hutchinson.
                • Image of writer and journalist Tom Sleigh

                  Virtual Lecture and Reading: Tom Sleigh

                  April 6, 2021 | 7:00 pm

                  In celebration of April as National Poetry Month, The Zuckerman Museum of Art debuted a new program series highlighting the literary art form's cultural significance.

                  On Tuesday, April 6, writer and journalist Tom Sleigh discussed his work and how it has been integrated into the artwork of Lesley Dill. During the virtual program, Sleigh read a selection of literary works, including poems; "Blueprint" and "Portrait of Myself as Jonathan Edwards' Spider." Artist Lesley Dill joined the writer to share further insight into their collaboration and the incorporation of Sleigh's language into Dill's artwork. 

                  Tom Sleigh's many books include House of Fact, House of Ruin, Station Zed, Army Cats (John Updike Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters), and Space Walk (Kingsley Tufts Award). His most recent book of essays, The Land Between Two Rivers: Writing In an Age of Refugees, recounts his time as a journalist in the Middle East and Africa. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, A Lila Wallace Award recipient, and has received two NEA grants in poetry. His new book of poems,The King's Touch, will be published by Graywolf in 2022. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Threepenny Review, Poetry,The Southern Review, and many other magazines. He is a Distinguished Professor in the MFA Program at Hunter College. 

                  • Tom Sleigh was born in Mount Pleasant, Texas. He attended the California Institute of the Arts and Evergreen State College, and earned an MA from Johns Hopkins University. Sleigh is the author of several books of poetry, including House of Fact, House of Ruin (Graywolf Press, 2018); Station Zed (Graywolf Press, 2015); Army Cats (Graywolf Press, 2011), winner of the John Updike Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; Space Walk (Houghton Mifflin, 2007), winner of the Kingsley Tufts Award; and Far Side of the Earth (Houghton Mifflin, 2003), winner of an Arts and Letters Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He has also published a translation of Euripides's Herakles and two books of essays, The Land between Two Rivers: Poetry in an Age of Refugees (Graywolf Press, 2018) and Interview with a Ghost (Graywolf Press, 2006).

                   

                  • Photo of Professor Chris Malone, leader of Storytelling through Composition Workshop event

                    The Art of Comics: Storytelling through Composition with Chris Malone

                    • February 12, 2021 | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm 
                    • April 3, 2021 | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

                    In these free storytelling through composition workshops, Professor Chris Malone taught participants to examine compositional techniques to create exciting narratives for readers. Participants also practiced using different framing methods and points of view to deepen their storytelling capacity.  

                    • Chris Malone is an Atlanta-based cartoonist who has worked on a variety of shows including the Emmy-winning Archer, Cyanide and Happiness, Adam Ruins Everything, Game Grumps, Baby Shark, and more. He focuses primarily on preproduction, such as storyboards/animatics, background design, and character design. He just recently started a new studio with a few other animators called Raging Viking Productions, where he is the lead background artist.

                      He is also an Assistant Professor of Animation over at Kennesaw State University, where he teaches animation and comic classes. He enjoys sharing his work experience in the classroom to help his students learn modern and relevant practices in the field.

                      Additionally, he has been working closely with the KSU's School of Visual Arts' new 3D printing farm. Using this technology, he is teaming up with the Wareswald archeological site in Saarthal, Germany to 3D scan broken statues, repairing missing pieces, then printing completed versions for study.

                      When he isn't working on cartoons or teaching, he can probably be found reading comic strips and at home, with both of his dogs asleep in his lap.

                    • Photo of curator Jennifer Inacio

                      HERstory Lecture: Jennifer Inacio

                      March 26, 2021 | 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

                      In March of 2021, the Zuckerman Museum of Art debuted a new, annual program series, HERstory: Women's Leadership in the Arts. The program offers lectures and interaction with prominent women artists, authors, curators, and artistic directors of various creative disciplines to our students and community-at-large. These prominent educational opportunities serve to highlight the crucial role of women in the arts and their notable, and many times ground-breaking, impact on creative fields, humanity, society, and young women's lives— inspiring them to become future leaders and cultural ambassadors of the arts. Moreover, this dynamic programming highlights those who have historically been underrepresented within these arenas. The program's compelling themes, such as the role of women's leadership in promoting cultural values of inclusivity and gender equality and cultural institutions' impact on the arts, will further champion our students to reach their goals re-redefine women's creative roles in the arts. Ensuring and empowering the next generation of creative women makers, leaders, problem solvers, and researchers realize their full potential is the hallmark of this Zuckerman Museum of Art program.

                      On Firday, March 26th associate curator, Jennifer Inacio presented a lecture on her recent group exhibition, at the Pérez Art Museum Miami [PAMM] titled MY BODY, MY RULES

                      Funding for this speaker was provided by the COTA DEI Committee Guest Lecture Grant

                      • MY BODY, MY RULES is conceived as a chant of empowerment, with the aim of stimulating awareness and asserting women’s authority and power over their own experiences. By condemning inequalities, revisiting traditional roles, deconstructing labels, and reclaiming power, the works in this exhibition offer a platform from which to reflect on contemporary female image narratives through a feminist lens. Together with a number of accompanying programs, the exhibition showcases the artists’ diverse cultural influences, prompting a collective, in-depth dialogue on how women have the right to own their lives and their bodies.

                      • Jennifer Inacio is associate curator at Pérez Art Museum Miami [PAMM]. She recently curated MY BODY, MY RULES (2020) and is currently working on the upcoming exhibition Felipe Mujica: The Swaying Motions on the Bank of the River Falls (2021). At PAMM she has curated Barbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca: Estás vendo coisas (2019); Pedro Neves Marques: A Mordida (2018); the museum's first Augmented Reality exhibition Felice Grodin: Invasive Species (2017–20); and Sid Grossman: Photography, Politics, and the Ethical Image (2018). She has been involved in developing and conceptualizing public programs at PAMM, where she has curated the film series Black Audio Film Collective at PAMM (2017), along with other exhibition related symposia. Inacio holds a Masters in Contemporary Art Theory from Goldsmiths, University of London (2014). She is an ambassador of The55Project.

                       

                      • Photo of Judith K. Brodsky in the studio by Andrea Warriner.

                        HERstory Lecture: Judith K. Brodsky 

                        March 24, 2021 | 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm 

                        In March of 2021, the Zuckerman Museum of Art debuted a new, annual program series, HERstory: Women's Leadership in the Arts. The program offers lectures and interaction with prominent women artists, authors, curators, and artistic directors of various creative disciplines to our students and community-at-large. These prominent educational opportunities serve to highlight the crucial role of women in the arts and their notable, and many times ground-breaking, impact on creative fields, humanity, society, and young women's lives— inspiring them to become future leaders and cultural ambassadors of the arts. Moreover, this dynamic programming highlights those who have historically been underrepresented within these arenas. The program's compelling themes, such as the role of women's leadership in promoting cultural values of inclusivity and gender equality and cultural institutions' impact on the arts, will further champion our students to reach their goals re-redefine women's creative roles in the arts. Ensuring and empowering the next generation of creative women makers, leaders, problem solvers, and researchers realize their full potential is the hallmark of this Zuckerman Museum of Art program.

                        On Wednesday, March 24th, Judith K. Brodsky shared insight into her career as an artist, author, and founding director of the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper, newly renamed the Brodsky Center at PAFA.

                        Funding for this speaker was provided by the COTA DEI Committee Guest Lecture Grant.

                        Photo of Judith K. Brodsky by Andrea Warriner.
                        • Judith Brodsky is an artist, author, printmaker, and founding director of the Rutgers Center for Innovative Print and Paper which she relocated from New Brunswick, New Jersey, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as the newly named Brodsky Center at PAFA. The Center is highly acclaimed for a prominent history of consistently and extensively supporting women artists, artists of color, and artists who have historically been under-represented in the arenas of printmaking, papermaking, contemporary art and in museum collections. Producing over 300 collaborative editions in handmade paper and print with a broad range of established and emerging artists, diversity has always been the prevailing hallmark of the Center’s mission and remains a testament to Brodsky’s far-reaching dedication to inclusivity. She will discuss The Brodsky Center, as well as her recent book,Junctures: Case Studies in Women’s Leadership, in which she and Ferris Olin profile female leaders in music, theater, dance, and visual art. The diverse women included in the book have made their mark by serving as executives or founders of art organizations, by working as activists to support the arts, or by challenging stereotypes about women in the arts. The contributors explore several important themes, such as the role of feminist leadership in changing cultural values regarding inclusivity and gender parity, as well as the feminization of the arts and the power of the arts as cultural institutions.

                           

                          “There will never be too many books teaching Women’s Herstory. Brodsky and Olin’s case studies describe the outrageous and humiliating strangleholds all women have endured and continue to face. Brodsky and Olin champion us to reach our goals.” -Elizabeth A. Sackler, PhD ― Founder, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum 


                          “New histories need to be written. Preserving stories that complicate and enrich mainstream narratives is vitally important, and the inspired and inspiring contributions groundbreaking women have made to our cultural world deserve to be celebrated. In addition to leading this charge themselves in their own remarkable careers, with the publication of Junctures in Women’s Leadership: The Arts, Judith Brodsky and Ferris Olin have given us the gift of expanding the canon through these remarkable case studies in creative leadership in the arts.” -Catherine Morris ― Sackler Senior Curator, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art Brooklyn Museum 

                         

                        • Cover of Diane Burko's publcation, "Endangered: From Glaciers to Reefs."

                          EQUINOX Program: Bearing Witness Lecture with Diane Burko and JD Talasek

                          March 16, 2021 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm 

                          As part of the international forum EQUINOX, scheduled to take place virtually March 15 – 19, 2021, the ZMA presented programming supporting the 2021 United Nations sustainable development goal of Climate Action. The Division of Global Affairs at Kennesaw State University, works to make the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals more widely known and implemented. The virtual lecture was moderated by Cynthia Nourse Thompson and Elizabeth Thomas of the ZMA.  

                          Diane Burko, a research-based artist whose practice is grounded in the intersecting arenas of art, science, the environment, and climate action discussed her collaborations and investigations with scientists, which augment her ongoing study of the natural world and climate change in a 45-minute lecture presentation. Her expeditions from the ice fields in Greenland and Antarctica to the glaciers in New Zealand, to the coral reefs in American Samoa have served as inspiration for her paintings. Public engagement is integral to her practice. Burko often participates in symposia with the scientific community to create a bridge between art and science and contributes to podcasts, blogs, interviews – all speaking to the urgency of environmental issues. 

                          Following Diane Burko’s talk, noted curator and scholar JD Talasek discussed his work as a curator and director of cultural programs at the National Academy of Sciences, both of which explore the intersections between science, medicine, technology, and visual culture. His work has also focused on climate action. In 2014, Talasek curated the exhibition Imagining Deep Time, and more recently was affiliated with the exhibition, Endangered: From Glaciers to Reefs, both of which included the work of Diane Burko. Talasek serves on an advisory panel that is currently exploring the creation of an art exhibition program at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC.

                          • Image of artist, Diane Burko mixing paint in her studio. Photo courtesy of the artist.

                            Diane Burko’s practice is at the intersection of Art, Science and the Environment focused on climate change. As a research-based artist, she collaborates with scientists, using their data, visiting their labs and bearing witness. She has investigated the ice fields of Greenland, Iceland, Svalbard and Alaska as well as Antarctica, Argentina’s Patagonia, and the melting glaciers in New Zealand’s southern alps. She next tackled our ocean’s coral reef eco-systems, making expeditions to Hawaii and American Samoa. She most recently spent a month exploring Chile’s Rapa Nui and Atacama Desert - yet another area of the world threatened by climate change.  
                             
                            Such experiences augment her ongoing study of the natural world inspires a studio production resulting in over 100 exhibitions throughout the country. Her work is found in such institutions as The Art Institute of Chicago, Denver Art Museum, Delaware Art Museum, Hood Museum, Michener Art Museum, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Tang Museum, the Tucson Museum of Art and the Zimmerli Museum.  


                            Public engagement is integral to her practice. Burko often participates in symposia with the scientific community to create a bridge between art and science, and contributes to podcasts, blogs, interviews – all speaking to the urgency of global warming, urging her audiences to reject fossil fuel dependency and be responsible citizens. 

                            “My inclination to witness, translate, and communicate scientific information is expressed through paintings, photographs and time-based media. It’s how I personally and professionally counter climate doubt – it’s my way of entering into the public discourse with the goal of moving the viewer to reflect, take responsibility and act.” 

                             

                          • Photo of curator JD Talasek.

                            JD Talasek is the director of Cultural Programs of the National Academy of Sciences (2101 Constitution Ave, NW, Washington DC), a program that is focused on the exploration of intersections between science, medicine, technology, and visual culture. He was the creator and organizer of the international on-line symposium on Visual Culture and Bioscience and co-editor of the published transcripts (distributed by D.A.P., March 2009). The second in this series of on-line symposia, Visual Culture and Evolution, was held from April 5 through April 14, 2010. Talasek is creator and moderator for a monthly salon called DC Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER) held at the NAS focused on cross-disciplinary discussion and community building. In 2014, Talasek will assume the position of Scholar in Residence at the Umlauf Museum and Sculpture Garden, Austin, Tx where he will help develop a Texas Art Science Evening Rendezvous program similar to the one in DC.

                            Talasek holds an MFA in studio arts from the University of Delaware, an MA in Museum Studies from the University of Leicester, and BS in Photography from East Texas State University. He is currently on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University in the Museum Studies Masters Program.

                            Talasek has curated several exhibitions at the National Academy of Sciences including Imagining Deep Time (2014), Visionary Anatomies (toured through the Smithsonian Institution, 2004 - 2006), Absorption + Transmission: work by Mike and Doug Starn, The Tao of Physics: Photographs by Arthur Tress, Cycloids: Paintings by Michael Schultheis. At the University of Delaware, he organized and curated Observations in an Occupied Wilderness: Photographs by Terry Falke and LightBox: the Visual AIDS Archive Project. Additionally, Talasek serves on the Contemporary Art and Science Committee (CASC) at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.

                            He is the art advisor for Issues in Science and Technology Magazine published by the University of Texas at Dallas, Arizona State University and The National Academies. Talasek is chair-elect for Leonardo’s Art Education and Forum. He is a member of: the College Art Association; Society of Photographic Educators; the Society for Literature, Science and Art; and the American Association of Museums.

                            He was born in 1966 in Dallas, Texas.

                          • Installation image of the exhibition "The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles" at the Zuckerman Museum of Art.

                            Comics in the University Setting Panel Discussion

                            February 25, 2021 | 7:00 pm

                            Guest Curator and Director of the School of Art and Design, Geo Sipp, moderated an engaging and organic conversation regarding the importance and relevancy of comics in the ecology of a contemporary university education. The panel featured Sergio Figueiredo and Erin Bahl of the KSU English Department and professors Chris Malone, Joseph Karg, and Craig Brasco of the KSU School of Art Design. The panel discussion was live-streamed from the Don Russell Clayton Gallery on February 25th, in the exhibition, The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles, curated by Geo Sipp. 

                            Installation image of the exhibition The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles at the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Photo by Mike Jensen. 
                            • Images of four participating artists in February Last Wednesday Lunch program: Craig Brasco, Donna Colebeck, Valerie Dibble, and Keith Smith.

                              Last Wednesday Lunch

                              February 24, 2021 | 12:30 pm

                              The spring 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch program featured faculty artists represented in the Spring 2021 Faculty Exhibition. Each month several faculty members shared their perspectives on the creative work they practice. The event on February 24th presented prerecorded presentations by Craig Brasco, Donna Colebeck, Valerie Dibble, and Keith Smith

                              Featured image of SOAAD Professors: (clockwise from top left) Craig Brasco, Donna Colebeck, Keith Smith, and Valerie Dibble.
                            • June Brigman and Louise Simonson, Power Pack, 1984. Image courtesy of the artists.

                              Artists in Dialogue: June Brigman and Geo Sipp

                              February 19, 2021 | 12:00 pm 

                              The Zuckerman Museum of Art hosted a virtual conversation between Guest Curator, Geo Sipp and renowned comic artist and SOAAD faculty member, June Brigman.

                              June Brigman and Louise Simonson, Power Pack, 1984. Image courtesy of the artists.
                              • June Brigman has enjoyed a long and varied career as a cartoonist, drawing such comic book titles as Alpha Flight, Supergirl, and Star Wars. She is the co-creator (with Louise Simonson) of the Power Pack series from Marvel Comics. She is also the co-creator (with Stuart Moore) of the Captain Ginger series from Ahoy Comics. Assisted by her husband, inker/colorist Roy Richardson, she illustrated the Brenda Starr comic strip for fifteen years, and has drawn many educational comics, as well as doing illustrations for Horse & Rider magazine. June and Roy have recently taken over the artistic reins of the long-running Mary Worth comic strip. June has a BFA in Sequential Art from Empire State University, and an MFA in Illustration from the Savannah College of Art and Design. She is currently an adjunct professor of Sequential Art at Kennesaw State University. When not at the drawing board, June is in the saddle riding Isabelle, her beautiful gray mare.

                              • Geo Sipp is the Director of the School of Art and Design at Kennesaw State University.

                                Geo Sipp is an artist and illustrator who has worked for top international advertising agencies and clients, and his work has been published by many of the leading newspapers, magazines and book publishers in the United States and abroad. Among his clients include: ABC Television, Atlanta Ballet, BBDO Advertising, BellSouth, Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, Coca-Cola, Delta Airlines, Fortune, General Electric, Harris Corporation - Trans-Siberian Railroad, Los Angeles Times, Metropolitan Opera, National Football League, Newsweek, New York Times, Reader's Digest, Sports Illustrated, St. Martin's Press, Time-Warner, United States Postal Service, U.S. News & World Report and the Walt Disney Company. Geo’s research and scholarship on sequential art has appeared in numerous national and international peer-reviewed publications and has resulted in international speaking engagements and exhibitions. His current work is primarily intended for inclusion in a graphic novel entitled Wolves in the City, which has the French-Algerian War as its subject.

                                His work has been exhibited at the Adam Baumgold Gallery in New York, Albrecht-Kemper Museum of Art, Weinberger Fine Arts in Kansas City, the Algerian Cultural Ministry in Algiers, Algeria,  Clemson University, International Print Center, New York, McClung Museum at the University of Tennessee, Sharjah Museum of Art in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama, Vero Beach Museum of Art, Vero Beach, Florida and the Zuckerman Museum of Art at Kennesaw State University. His work has also been exhibited in numerous solo and group exhibitions across the United States as well as in Algeria, Belgium, China, England, France, Spain, and Tunisia. He has lectured and given workshops at many universities including: the University of Kansas, Dartmouth College, École de Recherche Graphique Brussels, Institut St. Luc Brussels (ESA St. Luc), University of London, London College of Communications, and the University of London-Paris.

                                Sipp is a recipient of the Missouri Governor's Award for Excellence in Education. His artistic awards include numerous gold and silver ADDY’s for his work in the field of Illustration.

                                To learn more about Geo Sipp and see more of his work, please click here.

                               

                            • Installation view of "New Visions 2021" in the ZMA's Fine Arts Gallery.

                              Closing Celebration of New Visions 2021

                              February 17, 2021 | 7:00 pm

                              In compliance with health and safety recommendations, the closing reception for New Visions 2021 took place online. Guests were invited to join the museum's staff, School of Art and Design Director, Geo Sipp, and many of the School of Art and Design professors to celebrate and recognize the participants and award winners of this year's annual juried student exhibition, New Visions 2021. The final award selections made by juror Anthony Goicolea and the director's choice award made by Director Geo Sipp were presented during the virtual celebration.

                              • 1st Place, Juror's Choice Award Winner: Deonna Lizette for the work, Framed, 2020, oil on canvas.
                              • 2nd Place, Jurors Choice Award Winner: Jane Erwin for the work, Blue Moves, 2020, soda-fired ceramics.
                              • 3rd Place, Juror Choice Award Winner: Kristina Walker for the work, Sunday Girl, 2020, ink on paper.
                              • Director's Choice Award Winner: Sierra Kazin for the work, City Escape, 2020, mixed media.

                               

                            • Photo of the Zuckerman Museum of Art exterior at night

                              ZMA After-Hours

                              February 11, 2021 | 5:00 - 8:00 pm

                              The Zuckerman Museum offered a special, after-hours  opportunity to view the current exhibitions on Thursday, February 11th. Visitors were invited to explore The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles, several new project installations, and the annual juried student exhibition, New Visions 2021 between 5:00 amd 8:00 pm.  From 6:30 to 7:30 pm, visitors could participate in a walkthrough of The 9th Art: Frames and Thought Bubbles with Guest Curator Geo Sipp in our Don Russell Clayton Gallery.

                              • Images of participating SOAAD Professors Jonathan Fisher, Joseph Karg, Matt Haffner, and Joe Remillard.

                                Last Wednesday Lunch

                                January 27, 2021 | 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

                                The spring 2021 Last Wednesday Lunch program featured faculty artists represented in the Spring 2021 Faculty Exhibition. Each month several faculty members shared their perspectives on the creative work they practice. The event on January 27th presented prerecorded presentations by Jonathan Fisher, Matt Haffner, Joseph Karg, and Joe Remillard

                                Featured image of SOAAD Professors: (clockwise from top left) Jonathan Fisher, Joseph Karg, Matt Haffner, and Joe Remillard.
                              • Origin Map

                                Origins Map Project - Place your pin

                                The artworks held in public trust at Zuckerman Museum of Art were made by artists who come from many different places across the country and the world. The places of birth of the artists represented in A Peculiar Proximity to Spiritual Mysteries span three continents! A map of the world installed of the wall of the Pavilion plots those origins. We want to plot your place of origin, too!

                                We invite the KSU campus community and guests to register your place of birth to be added as a pin on our Origins Map.

                                No personally identifiable information is necessary to participate.

                                We live in an age when approximately 1 person out of every 30 is an immigrant. The vast majority of American citizens have roots in other parts of the world. Our ‘melting pot’ continues to connect people from distant cultures and walks of life. The Zuckerman Museum of Art celebrates the strength of our diverse Kennesaw State University!

                                • Book

                                  Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer

                                  November 19, 2020 | 3:00 – 5:00 pm

                                  The Zuckerman Museum of Art and the KSU Interdisciplinary Studies Department co-sponsor an ongoing series of book discussions open to the campus community. A title is selected to serve as a springboard for discussion of important issues currently relevant to both groups. 

                                  The Fall 2020 book Club virtual event discussed Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Dr. Kimmerer is Associate Professor of Environmental and Forest Biology at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry. She is the author of numerous scientific articles, and the book Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses. She is Potawatomi and combines her heritage with her scientific and environmental passions.

                                  • CIFAL

                                    Last Wednesday Lunch: Art as Activism

                                    November 18, 2020 | 12:30 - 1:00 pm

                                    Last Wednesday lunch is a monthly, half-hour lecture series offering visitors a digestible opportunity to connect with art and ideas on display at the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Each event will take place from 12:30 pm to 1:00 pm and will feature a new guest speaker.

                                    On November 18th, we heard from members of CIFAL Atlanta and their Distinguished Student Ambassador team speak about the creation of the exhibition Art as Activism: Social Justice and Sustainability which was on view in the Fine Arts Gallery from November 11th to November 20th, 2020.

                                    • Anthony Goicolea

                                      Anthony Goicolea: New Visions 2021 Lecture

                                      November 6, 2020 | 12:00 - 1:00 pm

                                      A special virtual lecture with Anthony Goicolea, the selected juror for the inaugural New Visions 2021, the annual juried student exhibition.  Hosted by the Zuckerman Museum of Art and Director of Curatorial Affairs, Cynthia Nourse Thompson, the hour-long virtual talk featured an insightful presentation by the artist examining his artistic practice.

                                      Anthony Goicolea is a first-generation Cuban American artist who was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Anthony utilizes a variety of media- including painting, photography, sculpture and video installation- in the creation of his compelling and many times foreboding visual narratives. Goicolea will discuss his work in these varied mediums and the principal ideas and explorations addressed in his work which include personal history, heritage, identity and cultural tradition. These are reflective of his own personal familial experiences— his extended family fled Cuba, not long after Castro came to power, and immigrated to the US. His works are also powerful and engaging contemplations on displacement and alienation. 

                                    • Erin Jane Nelson

                                      Last Wednesday Lunch: Erin Jane Nelson

                                      October 28, 2020 | 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

                                      Last Wednesday lunch is a monthly, half-hour lecture series offering visitors a digestible opportunity to connect with art and ideas on display at the Zuckerman Museum of Art. Each event will take place from 12:30 pm to 1:00 pm and will feature a new guest speaker. 

                                      On October 28th, the Zuckerman Museum of Art hosted it's your world for the moment artist, Erin Jane Nelson for a virtual lecture. Erin Jane Nelson is a native Atlantan who received her BFA from The Cooper Union in New York in 2011. Recent solo exhibitions include: כינהש (Shekinah), Chapter NY; Her Deepness at Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, and Psychopompopolis at DOCUMENT, Chicago. Her work has recently been featured in group exhibitions at La Galerie, centre d’art contemporain, Noisy-le-Sec, France; Deli Gallery, Brooklyn; Van Doren Waxter, New York; and Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich. Recent museum acquisitions of her work are currently included in Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950-2019 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and Other.Worldly at the Fries Museum in Leeuwarden, the Netherlands. She was named one of Forbes Magazine's "30 Under 30" in Arts and Culture in 2019 and is a 2020 recipient of the Rabkin Award for Arts Journalism. In addition to her art practice, she is the Director of Burnaway.org. 

                                    • Mendieta

                                      Mendieta: Land, Body, Identity - Hispanic Heritage Student Tour

                                      • October 8, 2020 | 2:00 - 3:00 pm
                                      • October 12, 2020 | 10:00 – 11:00 am

                                      Location: Mortin Gallery

                                      Students were invited to participate in a special conversation with Michelle Lopez, Collections Manager at the Zuckerman Museum of Art, as she shared information about the distinguished life and art of the late Cuban artist Ana Mendieta, whose art was on display in the Mortin Gallery. Lopez also shared stories from her own upbringing in an expatriate Cuban family. Students were invited to share their stories of being Latinx in America as well. Learn more about the exhibition that featured the work of Ana Mendieta here

                                      • Keith Smith

                                        Last Wednesday Lunch: Keith Smith

                                        September 30, 2020 | 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm

                                        Last Wednesday lunch is a monthly, half-hour lecture series offering visitors a digestible opportunity to connect with art and ideas on display at the Zuckerman Museum of Art. On September 30th, 2020, A Peculiar Proximity to Spiritual Mysteries artist, Keith Smith shared insight into his work and artistic practice. 

                                      • John Lawless on drums

                                        Interchange at the ZMA

                                        September 17, 2020 | 7:30 p.m. 

                                        Interchange is an annual collaboration across all disciplines of the arts that celebrates the spark that all the creative arts enkindle in one another. The 2020 Interchange program was presented virtually and featured eight ArtsKSU faculty performances in response to the exhibited works in the Zuckerman Museum of Art’s galleries.

                                      • Bell Hooks Book Club

                                        Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by bell hooks

                                        August 10, 2020 | 4:00 - 6:00 

                                        The Zuckerman Museum of Art and the Gender and Women's Studies Program co-sponsor an ongoing series of book discussions open to the campus community. A title is selected to serve as a springboard for discussion of important issues currently relevant to both groups.

                                        The Spring 2020 Book Club discussed Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by bell hooks. In this 1995 publication, hooks, a leading cultural critic, responds to the ongoing dialogues about producing, exhibiting, and criticizing art and aesthetics in an art world increasingly concerned with identity politics. The discussion centered around identity politics and how they played a role in the artistic choices displayed in the work of our exhibitions, UNBOUND and Looming Chaos, and how they continue to play a role in the world today.


                                         

                                         

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