Academic Degrees, Programs and Concentrations

Matt Haffner's Paper Moon Artwork Detail

Detail of Matthew Haffner's installation from the 2012 Paper Moon exhibiition. Photo by Shane McDonald

BFA Art

This program prepares students for a variety of art and art related careers or graduate school by providing a thorough grounding in fundamental principles and techniques with opportunities for emphasis in one or more fine arts areas.

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Overview

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art is a highly competitive professional degree program. The BFA prepares students for a variety of art and art related careers or graduate school by providing a thorough grounding in fundamental principles and techniques with opportunities for emphasis in one or more fine arts areas. This degree focuses on intensive work in art or design supported by a program of general studies. The BFA degree offers a concentration in the following 6 areas:

Ceramics
Graphic Communication
Painting and Drawing
Photography
Printmaking
Sculpture

All art and art education majors are required to take lower-division major requirements in art and art history before taking upper-division art or art education courses. ART 2990, Professional Practices & Portfolio Review, is required of all BFA art majors before submitting a portfolio for acceptance into a specific concentration area.

More information:

Semester schedules of art classes are available at the Registrar's Web Page.

Course requirements are also available online in the KSU Undergraduate Catalog.

Advisement worksheet: PRINTABLE BFA ADVISING CHECKSHEET (ENACTED FALL, 2014)

General Education Curriculum

It is not recommended to complete all core curriculum requirements before enrolling in studio art courses. Please see an advisor to plan your schedule.

Area of Study (See official course catalog) Credits
Essential Skills 9
Social Issues 5
Humanities/Fine Arts 6
Science, Mathematics and Technology 10-11
Social Sciences 12

TOTAL

42

Course Title Credits
HPS 1000 Fitness for Living 3
KSU 1101 First Year Seminar
(or enrollment in a Learning Community)
3

TOTAL

3-6

Art Course Curriculum

Lower-Division Major Requirements (18 credits)

Course Title Credits
ART 1100 2-D Design and Color Theory 3
ART 1150 Drawing I 3
ART 1200 3-D Design 3
ART 2150 Drawing II 3
ART 2550 Computer Applications in Art 3
ART 2990 Professional Practices / Portfolio 3
Entrance Portfolio Submission

Art History (12 credits)

Course Title Credits

Two required courses and any two upper-division art history classes:

ARH 2750 Ancient-Medieval Art 3
ARH 2850 Renaissance-Modern Art 3

Any two courses from the following:

ARH 3000 Survey of Asian Art
3
ARH 3100 African Art 3
ARH 3150 Islamic Art 3
ARH 3200 Art of the Ancient Americas 3
ARH 3240 Native North American Art 3
ARH 3250 Latin American Art 3
ARH 3300 Ancient Egyptian Art 3
ARH 3320 Ancient Near Eastern Art 3
ARH 3350 Art of Ancient Greece 3
ARH 3370 Roman Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3400 Medieval Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3500 Italian Renaissance Art 3
ARH 3600 Baroque Art 3
ARH 3700 Nineteenth-Century Art 3
ARH 3750 History of American Art 3
ARH 3850 Art Since 1900 3
ARH 3990 Research Methods in Art Hist. 3
ARH 4000 Historical Studio Practices 3
ARH 4150 African-American Art 3
ARH 4400 Directed Study 3
ARH 4490 Special Topics in Art History 3
ARH 4500 Women in Art 3
ARH 4700 Victorian Art and Culture 3
ARH 4840 History of Graphic Design 3
ARH 4900 Contemporary Art 3
TPS 3493 Performance Art 3

Distribution Requirements (9 credits)

Course Title Credits

Select three from outside the concentration area. At least one 2-D and one 3-D area must be represented.

ART 3015 Electronic Illustration
3
ART 3120 Ceramics I 3
ART 3160 Painting I 3
ART 3300 Sculpture I 3
ART 3320 Jewelry and Small Metals I 3
ART 3400 Digital Photography 3
ART 3410 Film Photography 3
ART 3500 Printmaking I 3
ART 3550 Book Arts and Papermaking 3
ART 3990 Art As a Public Profession 3

One of the following courses:

ART 4990 Senior Exhibition
3
ART 4980 Senior Portfolio Project
(for Graphic Communication concentration only)
3

Also choose free elective courses for a total of 6 credits

6

Ceramics Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3150 Figure Drawing 3
ART 3120 Ceramics I 3
ART 3360 Ceramics II 3
ART 3380 Ceramics III 3
ART 4360 Advanced Study in Ceramics 3
ART 4360 Advanced Study in Ceramics (repeated) 3
ART 4360 Advanced Study in Ceramics (repeated) 3
Also choose electives in any ART, ARH, or ARED 3000- or 4000-level course for a total of 9 credits 9

Graphic Communications Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3011 Typography I
3
ART 3015 Electronic Illustration 3
ART 3020 Typography II 3
ART 3021 Publication Design 3
ART 3022 Pre-Press 3
ART 4021 Advertising and Packaging
3
ART 4022 Introduction to Web Design 3
ART 4023 Interactive Media Design 3
ART 4030 Design Practicum 3
ART 4024 Motion Graphics
(Or another elective course.
Check with your advisor for offerings.)
3

Painting and Drawing Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3150 Figure Drawing 3
ART 3160 Painting I 3
ART 3260 Painting II 3
ART 3265 Aqueous Media 3
Also choose electives in any ART, ARH, or ARED 3000- or 4000-level course for a total of 6 credits 6
12 credits in any combination from the following repeatable courses: 12
ART 4150 Advanced Study in Drawing
ART 4255 Advanced Study in the Figure
ART 4265 Advanced Study in Painting

Photography Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3150 Figure Drawing 3
ART 3400 Digital Photography 3
ART 3410 Film Photography 3
ART 3420 Lighting and Large Formats 3
ART 4410 Adv. Study in Photography 3
ART 4410 Adv. Study in Photography (repeated) 3
ART 4410 Adv. Study in Photography (repeated) 3
Also choose electives in any ART, ARH, or ARED 3000- or 4000-level course for a total of 9 credits 9

Printmaking Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3150 Figure Drawing 3
ART 3500 Printmaking I 3
ART 3510 Printmaking II 3
ART 3520 Planographic Techniques I 3
ART 3550 Book Arts and Papermaking 3
9 credits in any combination from the following repeatable courses: 9
ART 4510 Adv. Study in Printmaking
ART 4520 Planographic Techniques II
Also choose electives in any ART, ARH, or ARED 3000- or 4000-level course for a total of 6 credits 6

Sculpture Concentration Requirements

Course

Title

Credits

ART 3150 Figure Drawing 3
ART 3300

Sculpture I

3
ART 3310 Sculpture II 3
ART 4310 Adv. Study in Sculpture 3
ART 4310 Adv. Study in Sculpture (repeated) 3
ART 4310 Adv. Study in Sculpture (repeated) 3
ART 4310 Adv. Study in Sculpture (repeated) 3
Also choose electives in any ART, ARH, or ARED 3000- or 4000-level course for a total of 9 credits 9

BS Art Education

This single field program is designed to prepare students to become art teachers at all grade levels (Pre-kindergarten through grade 12). It leads to P-12 teacher certification in the teaching field of art in Georgia.

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Overview

The Bachelor of Science in Art Education leads to teacher certification in grades Pre-kindergarten through 12. This program is based on the Discipline-Based Art Education model with a curriculum that includes study in studio, art history, aesthetics and art criticism.The art education program is aligned with the National Standards in Visual Arts, the Quality Core Curriculum of Georgia, and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The program provides students with a broad foundation in general education, extensive study in art, and professional education and field experiences.

This single field program is designed to prepare art teachers at all grade levels (Pre-kindergarten through grade 12). It leads to P-12 teacher certification in the teaching field of art in Georgia. Candidates complete the equivalent of a major in art and a second major in pedagogical studies with an emphasis on teaching art. Based on the Discipline Based Model of Art Education, the curriculum in the teaching field includes study in studio, art history, aesthetics and art criticism.

All art and art education majors are required to take art and art history foundation course work in lower division major requirements before taking upper division art or art education courses. ART 3000, the Professional Practices Seminar & Portfolio Review course, is required of all art and art education majors during the semester of completion of lower division major requirements or before the completion of six hours of upper level art or art education courses. All transfer students with transfer credit in lower division major requirements must take Art 3000 the first semester enrolled in upper level art or art education courses.

Each program of study is a sequentially-based curriculum beginning the first semester of the freshman year. Students who delay entering the major until completion of the General Education Core Curriculum may prolong their academic careers.

More information:
Semester schedules of art classes are available at the Registrar's Web Page.
Course requirements are also available online in the KSU Undergraduate Catalog.

Advisement worksheets:

PRINTABLE ADVISING CHECKSHEET FOR ART EDUCATION

General Education Curriculum

It is not recommended to complete all core curriculum requirements before enrolling in studio art courses. Please see an advisor to plan your schedule.

Area of Study (See official course catalog) Credits
Essential Skills 9
Social Issues 5
Humanities/Fine Arts 6
Science, Mathematics and Technology 10-11
Social Sciences 12

TOTAL

42

Course Title Credits
HPS 1000 Fitness for Living 3
KSU 1101 First Year Seminar
(or enrollment in a Learning Community)
3

TOTAL

3-6

Art Education Curriculum


Lower-Division Major Requirements (18 credits)

Course Title Credits
ART 1100 2-D Design and Color Theory 3
ART 1150 Drawing I 3
ART 1200 3-D Design 3
ART 2150 Drawing II 3
ART 2550 Computer Applications in Art 3
ART 2990 Professional Practices / Portfolio 3
Entrance Portfolio Submission: All students must submit a portfolio of their work. Students must pass this review to be admitted as an art major and enroll in further art studio classes beyond ART 1100 and ART 1150

Teaching Field Requirements (9 credits)

Art education majors are required to apply for admission into the Teacher Education Program after taking EDUC 2110. Deadlines for Teacher Education Admissions are September 15, February 15, and April 15. Please refer to the TEAC Web site for further information and forms. Please see the Art Education Program Coordinator in the School of Art and Design for additional information.

Course Title Credits
EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education 3
EDUC2120 Sociocultural Influences on Teaching and Learning 3
EDUC2130 Exploring Teaching and Learning
3

Upper Division Major Requirements (29 credits)

The upper level studio courses are basic requirements. Art education students may elect to take additional course work in specific studio areas such as drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, and graphic communications. Additional studio work is highly recommended for students planning to do graduate study.

Course Title Credits
ART 3120 Ceramics I 3
ART 3155 Art Education Life Drawing 3
ART 3160 Painting I 3
ART 3300 Sculpture I 3
ART 3400 Digital Photography 3
ART 3500 Printmaking I 3

Select two of the following courses in Art History for a total of 6 credits:

ARH 2750 Ancient-Medieval Art
3
ARH 2850 Renaissance-Modern Art 3
ARH 3850 Art Since 1990 3

The senior seminar and exhibition must be arranged at least two semesters in advance.
Contact the Zuckerman Museum and Galleries Office for specific details and for an application.

ART 4990 Senior Art Seminar and Exhibition 3

Professional Education (P-12) Requirements (30 credits)

Course Title Credits
ARED 3302 Teaching, Learning and Development in Visual Arts 3
ARED 3304 Teaching Art History, Criticism and Aesthetics 3
ARED 3308 Special Populations in Art Education 3
ARED 3306 Materials, Methods and Management for Teaching Art 3
ARED 4410 Intercultural Curriculum Model 3
ARED 4425 Teaching of Art: Practicum
Deadlines for ARED 4425 field experience:
for Fall, the previous March 15; for Spring, the previous August 30.
3
ART 4470 Student Teaching
Admission to Teacher Education must be completed and student must have a 2.75 GPA in order to take ARED 4470. Deadlines for ARED 4470 field experience:
for Fall, the previous January 30; for Spring, the previous August 30.
12

BA Art History

The Art History major introduces students to visual culture from a range of periods, regions, and contexts, and it teaches them how to analyze both objects and texts as historical evidence.

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Overview

The Art History major introduces students to visual culture from a range of periods, regions, and contexts, and it teaches them how to analyze both objects and texts as historical evidence. We train our students to examine all aspects of visual culture in society, including its techniques, makers, patrons, viewers, and collectors. The program is rigorous, global, and interdisciplinary: our students explore art history and its theoretical methods, and they take courses in related disciplines such as anthropology, film studies, gender and women’s studies, history, literature, philosophy, and studio art. Our students also study at least one ancient or modern language that is associated with their main area of interest. Throughout their programs, we teach them how to do independent research, to construct effective arguments, and to produce well-written prose. We encourage them to publish their research in the Kennesaw Journal of Undergraduate Research as well as to present it at campus, regional, and national conferences. Our students may work at Kennesaw State’s Zuckerman Museum of Art, do internships at other metropolitan Atlanta museums, participate in archaeological excavations, and study abroad. Kennesaw State’s Art History Club, moreover, takes students on field trips and enables them to make both professional connections and lasting friendships. Our alumni have found our curriculum to be especially helpful preparation for work in museums, galleries, and graduate school. And because it improves marketable skills in critical thinking and communication, art history is not just a pre-professional major for future art historians. It is an effective major for students who plan to enter a variety of careers, including those in business, law, private and non-profit organizations, professional writing, and publishing. Please consider joining our global, interdisciplinary, and exciting program!

More information:
Semester schedules of art classes are available at the Registrar's Web Page.
Course requirements are also available online in the KSU Undergraduate Catalog.

Advisement worksheets:

BA ART HISTORYADVISING CHECKSHEET

Curriculum

General Education Curriculum

ESSENTIAL SKILLS (9 credits)

Composition (6 credits)
ENGL 1101 (Composition I)1 3
ENGL 1102 (Composition II)2 3
Mathematics (3 credits)
(MATH 1101, 1111, 1112, 1113, or 1190 6 ) 3 3

SOCIAL ISSUES [Institutional Option] (5 credits)

(ANTH 2105, GEOG 2105, PSYC 2105, SOCI 2105, or CRJU 2015) 1 2
AMST 1102, COM 1109, FL 1002 16 , PHIL 2200, AADS 1102, GWST 1102, LALS 1102, PAX 1102, or RELS 1102 3

HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS (6 credits)

ENGL 2110 (World Literature)7 3
ART 1107, DANC 1107, MUSI 1107, or TPS 1107 - Arts in Society 3

SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND TECHNOLOGY 18 (10-11 credits)

SCI 1101 8, GEOG 1112 8, GEOG 1113 8, CHEM 1211/1211L 4,
CHEM 1151/1151L 5, PHYS 1111 6, or PHYS 2211 9
3 or 4
SCI 1102 10, GEOG 1112 8, GEOG 1113 8, CHEM 1212/1212L 11,
CHEM 1152/1152L 12, PHYS 1112 13, or PHYS 2212 14
3 or 4
(MATH 1106 or MATH 1107) 15, MATH 1190 6, or MATH 2202 9 3

Social Issues, Science, Mathematics and Technology Course Names

AADS 1102 - African Diaspora Studies Issues
GEOG 1112 - Weather and Climate
GEOG 1113 - Introduction to Landforms
GWST 1102 - Love and Sex
CHEM 1211 - General Chemistry I
CHEM 1211L - General Chemistry I Lab
CHEM 1151 - Survey of Chemistry I
CHEM 1151L - Survey of Chemistry I Lab
CHEM 1212 - General Chemistry II
CHEM 1212L - General Chemistry II Lab
CHEM 1152 - Survey of Chemistry II
CHEM 1152L - Survey of Chemistry II Lab
LALS 1102 - Understanding Latin America
MATH 1106 - Elementary Applied Calculus
MATH 1107 - Elementary Statistics
MATH 1190 - Calculus I
PAX 1102 - Understanding Peace and Conflict
PHYS 1111 - Introductory Physics I
PHYS 2211 - Principles of Physics I
PHYS 1112 - Introductory Physics II
PHYS 2212 - Principles of Physics II
RELS 1102 - Understanding Religious Studies
SCI 1101 - Science, Society, & Environment I
SCI 1102 - Science, Society, & Environment II


SOCIAL SCIENCES (12 credits)

POLS 1101 - American Government / Global Perspectives 1 3
ECON 1100 - Global Economics 8 or
ECON 2100 - Principles of Microeconomics 15
3
HIST 1110 - Introduction to World History 3
HIST 2112 - America Since 1890 3

OTHER REQUIREMENTS (3-6 credits)

HPS 1000 - Fitness for Living 3
KSU 1101 - First Year Seminar
OR Enrollment in a Learning Community? 17
 

Total Credit Hours in General Education = 45


PROGRAM TOTAL CREDIT HOURS = 123

FOOTNOTES

  1. Prerequisites: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, if required
  2. Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 with C or better
  3. Prerequisite: MATH 0098 or MATH 0099, if required
  4. Corequisite: MATH 1112 or MATH 1113
  5. Prerequisites: READ 0099, & MATH 0099, if required
  6. Prerequisite: MATH 1112 or MATH 1113
  7. Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with C or better
  8. Prerequisites: ENGL 0099, READ 0099, & MATH 0098 or MATH 0099, if required
  9. Prerequisite: MATH 1190
  10. Prerequisite: SCI 1101 or Departmental approval
  11. Prerequisite: “C” or better grade in CHEM 1211
  12. Prerequisite: CHEM 1151 and CHEM 1151L
  13. Prerequisite: PHYS 1111
  14. Prerequisite: PHYS 2211
  15. Prerequisite: MATH 1101 or MATH 1111 or MATH 1112 or MATH 1113
  16. Prerequisite: 1 year of the same FL in high school or FL 1001. (FL=Foreign Language
    denoting one of the options, e.g., SPAN, FREN, GRMN, etc.)
  17. All first-year full-time students entering with fewer than 15 credits are required to take
    KSU 1101 or enroll in a Learning Community.
  18. Although any math and science courses meeting the criteria are acceptable, most nonscience and non-math majors take SCI 1101, SCI 1102, and MATH 1107

Art History Requirements

LOWER-DIVISION Major Requirements (Area F) - 18 Credit Hours

Course Title Credits
ARH 2750 Ancient Through Medieval Art 3
ARH 2850 Renaissance Through Modern Art 3
FL 1001 Introduction to Foreign Language and Culture I 3
FL 1002 Introduction to Foreign Language and Culture II 3
FL 2001 Intermediate Foreign Language and Culture I 3

Select one of the following:

ART 1100 2-D Design & Color Theory 3
ART 1150 Drawing I 3

ADDITIONAL Foreign Language Requirement - 3 Credit Hours

FL 2002 Intermediate Foreign Language and Culture II 3

UPPER-DIVISION Major Requirements - 27 Credit Hours

Course Title Credits
ARH 3990 Research Methods in Art History 3

Select eight of the following, including at least one from each area:

Ancient-Medieval Art and Architecture
ARH 3200Ancient American Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3300Ancient Egyptian and Nubian Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3320Ancient Near Eastern Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3350Greek Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3370Roman Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3400Medieval Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3398Internship* 3
ARH 4400Directed Study * 3
ARH 4490Special Topics in Art History* 3
Renaissance-Contemporary Art and Architecture
ARH 3500Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3600Baroque Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3700Nineteenth-Century Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3750History of American Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3850Art Since 1900 3
ARH 4000Historical Studio Practices 3
ARH 4150African-American Art 3
ARH 4500Women in Art 3
ARH 4700 Victorian Art and Culture 3
ARH 4750 American Landscape Painting 3
ARH 4820History of Printmaking 3
ARH 4850History of Graphic Design 3
ARH 4870History of Photography 3
ARH 4900Contemporary Art 3
ARH 3398Internship* 3
ARH 4400Directed Study * 3
ARH 4490Special Topics in Art History* 3
Global/Non-Western Art and Architecture
ARH 3000Asian Art and Architecture 3
ASIA 4422Archaeology of Asia 3
ARH 3100African Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3150Islamic Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3240Native North American Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3250Latin-American Art and Architecture 3
ARH 3398Internship* 3
ARH 4400Directed Study* 3
ARH 4490Special Topics in Art History* 3
*NOTE: With topic appropriate to area and approval of advisor.

SENIOR CAPSTONE COURSE (3 Credit Hours)

Course Title Credits
ARH 4990 Senior Capstone Project 3

RELATED STUDIES (15 Credit Hours)

Upper-division studies beyond the major requirements as approved by the academic advisor

FREE ELECTIVES (12 Credit Hours)

Any courses in the university curriculum

Important Note:  The faculty advisor serves as a guide in schedule planning. The ultimate responsibility of meeting degree requirements resides with the student. The above listings are for quick reference. Please refer to the KSU Undergraduate Catalog for the most current requirements.

Languages, Related Studies, & Electives

Selecting a Language

In consultation with a faculty advisor, students should carefully select language(s) to study based on their cultural and regional interests. Reading proficiency of foreign languages is necessary for advanced art-historical work because art historians read primary textual material from the cultures that they investigate and they also read scholarly research that is published in languages other than English. In addition, graduate programs require a reading knowledge of two languages. For example, students with a strong interest in ancient Mediterranean art should take Latin, and students with a strong interest in East Asian art should take Chinese or Japanese. Students with undecided or general art-historical interests should take German and/or French because much art-historical scholarship has been written in these languages and some (but not all) graduate programs in art history require proficiency in them. Please see the Undergraduate Catalog and the Department of Foreign Languages for the complete list of languages that Kennesaw State offers.

Selecting Related Studies and Elective Courses

In consultation with a faculty advisor, students should select related studies and elective courses that support and complement their art-historical interests. Kennesaw State offers art history majors the opportunity to use their language, related studies, and elective courses to complete a minor or certificate program such as African and African American Studies; American Studies; Anthropology; Asian Studies; Chemistry (for Conservation Studies); Chinese Studies; Classical Studies; Film Studies; French and Francophone Studies; Gender and Women’s Studies; German Studies; History; Italian Studies; Language and Literary Studies; Latin American/Latino Studies; Management; Marketing; Native-American Studies; Philosophy; Public History (Museum Studies); Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies; or Spanish. For details about the requirements of these programs, please see the Undergraduate Catalog.

Applying for Global Engagement Certification

Many courses in art history majors’ programs are designated as Global Learning Courses by Kennesaw State. Our students therefore may wish to apply for Global Engagement Certification. Please see the Global Engagement Certification Programs for more information.

People

Program Coordinator

Kristen Seaman
(678) 797-2189
kseaman1@kennesaw.edu
VA 101A

Art History Faculty

Diana McClintock, Modern and Contemporary Art
Daniel Sachs, Renaissance, Baroque, and Early Modern Art
Kristen Seaman, Ancient Mediterranean Art and Archaeology
Jessica Stephenson, Arts of Africa and the Americas, Museum Studies
Joe A. Thomas, Modern and Contemporary Art, Sexuality and Representation, Italian Renaissance Art

Associated Faculty in the School of Art and Design

Sandra Bird, Islamic Art
Valerie Dibble, History of Printmaking
Matthew Haffner, History of Photography
Carole Maugé-Lewis, History of Graphic Design
Teresa Reeves, Contemporary Art, Museum Studies

Associated Faculty in Other Departments

Faculty members in other Kennesaw State departments also deal with visual and material culture in their courses and research:
Jennifer Dickey, Heritage Preservation and Public History (Department of History and Philosophy)
Larrie Dudenhoeffer, Film Studies (Department of English)
Catherine Lewis, Museum Studies and Public History (Department of History and Philosophy)
Terry Powis, Archaeology of the Americas (Department of Geography and Anthropology)
Teresa Raczek, Archaeology of Southeast Asia (Department of Geography and Anthropology)
Michael Tierce, Film Studies (Department of English)

Student Organizations & Resources

Kennesaw State University Art History Club

Faculty advisor: Diana McClintock

The Art History Club is open to anyone who would like to explore museums, galleries, and other art venues and to share interests in art from all times and places. Activities include field trips to exhibits and events in the greater Atlanta Metro area (as well as occasional out-of-town “art attack” weekend adventures), attendance at symposia and lectures, career-planning workshops, and the annual “Come as Your Favorite Artist or Work of Art” costume party. Please see our Facebook page.
Other organizations and resources at Kennesaw State:

Zuckerman Museum of Art at Kennesaw State
Students who are interested in working or volunteering at the ZMA should contact its Outreach Coordinator, Katy Malone (Email: kmalon31@kennesaw.edu)

Kennesaw Journal of Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate Research Club

Undergraduate research funding awards for travel to conferences

Professional Organizations:

College Art Association

Southeastern College Art Conference

Art History News

Faculty News

Sandra Bird’s essay “Islamic Aesthetics” was published in The Middle East: Its History and Culture (CDL Press 2012).

Diana McClintock’s essay “Melancholia, Subversion, and Guerilla Art History” appeared in Robert Sherer’s Bloodworks (Kennesaw State University Press 2012). She presented “Howard Finster’s ‘Paradise Garden’: A Phenomenological Examination of Living Religious Art” at the 33rd International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany, and she co-chaired a session at the 2013 College Art Association Conference in New York, NY (“The Work of Art Criticism in the Age of Blogs and Ezines”). She also won a Global Engagement Grant from Kennesaw State’s College of the Arts to lead a student trip to Paris, France and the Venice Biennale in Italy during Summer 2013. She remains a regular contributor to Art Papers, and her essay "Howard Finster's ‘Paradise Garden’: A Phenomenological Examination of Living Religious Art" will be published in The Challenge of the Object (Germanisches Nationalmuseum 2013).

Daniel Sachs’s article “Rodin and Michelangelo: A New Perspective” was published in Source: Notes in the History of Art 11 (2012). He also taught art history at the Hanyang University International Summer School in Seoul, South Korea during Summer 2013.

Kristen Seaman presented “The Local Perspective on Graeco-Roman Classicism in Gandharan Sculpture” at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, WA and “Rhetoric and Cross-cultural Exchange in Gandharan Sculpture” at the 2013 College Art Association Conference in New York, NY. In addition, her work on “The Anxiety of Social Status among Greek Artists and Craftsmen” was presented at the Craft and People conference at the British Museum in London, United Kingdom. With the help of a Holder Professional Development Award from Kennesaw State’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, she also examined excavated sculpture from the Agora in Athens, Greece. In Fall 2013, she will speak about “Greek Rhetoric and Insular Cultural Production in the Hellenistic World” at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research in Baltimore, MD, and she will be the Haines Morris Distinguished Lecturer in Classics at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she will discuss “Cultural Interaction (and Reaction) in the Courtly Art of the Hellenistic World” and “Art History and Criticism in Ancient Greece.”

Jessica Stephenson’s essay “Mirror Dance: Artists, Tourists, and First Nation Heritage in Botswana" will appear in The Anthropology of Art/The Art of Anthropology (Newfound Press 2013). In Fall 2013, she also will present “Beyond Representation: Sufi Saint Shrines in North and West Africa” at the 2013 Southeastern College Art Conference in Greensboro, NC, and she will give two invited lectures at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University: “Moments of Memory: Fang Byeri Sculptures in Gabonese National Consciousness” and “What Color is the Sacred? Indigo in Africa.”

Joe Thomas presented “The Object of Christian Science: Word, Image, and Spirituality in Robert Indiana” at the 33rd International Congress of the History of Art in Nuremberg, Germany and “Contingent, Adjunct, Part-Time, Temporary: Making It Work” at the 2013 College Art Association Conference in New York, NY. He also curated the “Not What It Seems” exhibition in Kennesaw State’s Fine Arts Gallery. His essay “The Object of Christian Science” will be published in The Challenge of the Object (Germanisches Nationalmuseum 2013).

Student News

Lauren Bearden received a 2013 Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Funding Award from Kennesaw State’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. She also published “Repatriating the Bust of Nefertiti: A Critical Perspective of Cultural Ownership” in Kennesaw Journal of Undergraduate Research 2.1 (2012). She presented papers at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, WA (“Hybridization and Nabataean Identity in the Khazneh Façade at Petra”) and the 2013 Collage Colloquium at Agnes Scott College (“Nabataean Aesthetics: Dueling Imagery at Petra in Ancient Jordan”), where she won the Best Paper Award. She also will speak about “Aniconism in Ancient Petra” at the 2013 Southeastern College Art Conference in Greensboro, NC. She was the secretary of Kennesaw State’s Art History Club, participated in Kennesaw State’s 2013 Symposium of Student Scholars, and worked at Kennesaw State’s Museums and Galleries and at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University. Having graduated in May 2013 with a major in Art History and a minor in Classical Studies, she begins post-baccalaureate study in Latin and German at Georgia State University in Fall 2013.

Monisha Bernard worked at Kennesaw State’s Museums and Galleries. She is majoring in Art History and completing a Certificate in Public History.

Jessie Blowers was the School of Art and Design’s 2013 Outstanding Art History Scholar and Kennesaw State’s 2013 Regents Scholar. She worked at Kennesaw State’s Museums and Galleries, and she served as an intern for a research project about Howard Finster’s Paradise Garden in Summerville, GA. At Kennesaw State, she also founded the KSU Peace Project, which earned her an invitation to a Carter Center Board of Counselors meeting in Atlanta, and she spoke in Kennesaw State’s 2012 Pathways to Peace Lecture Series. She graduated in December 2012 with a major in Art History, and she currently works as a creative consultant/executive assistant in the Atlanta area.

Alumnus Tyler Crafton received an MA with distinction in Art History and Museum Curating at the University of Sussex in the United Kingdom after completing the thesis “‘Artefacts’ that Enhance, Engage and Develop Understanding: The Relevance of the Historic Clothing Project at the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum.” He has served as an intern at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University and at the Booth Western Art Museum in Cartersville, GA. He currently works at the Atlanta History Center as the Costume Manual Developer.

Jane Custer won a 2013 scholarship from Kennesaw State’s College of the Arts. She presented “An Approachable God: Hermes in the Temple of Hera at Olympia, Greece” at the 2013 Collage Colloquium at Agnes Scott College. She worked at Kennesaw State’s Museums and Galleries and was a member of Kennesaw State’s Public History team that advised the Salzburger Museum and New Ebenezer Historic Site in Rincon, GA. In addition, she also served as a judge for the Exhibits category in Kennesaw State’s 2013 History Day competition for Georgia’s middle and high school students. She is majoring in Art History and completing a Certificate in Public History.

Judith Murphy won a 2012 scholarship from Kennesaw State’s College of the Arts. She served as the president of Kennesaw State’s Art History Club and worked at Kennesaw State’s Museums and Galleries. She also digitized the art collection of Bill Arnett, was a Golden Key Honorary, and received a STARS Student Award for Kennesaw State’s study abroad program in Montepulciano, Italy. She presented “Maya: The First Renaissance” at the 2013 Collage Colloquium at Agnes Scott College, and she will speak about “Tools of the Pre-Columbian Mayan Painter” at the 2013 Southeastern College Art Conference in Greensboro, NC. Having graduated in May 2013 with a major in Art History, she begins an MA program in Public History with Museum Certification at the University of West Georgia in Fall 2013.

Art History Minor

The Art History minor program welcomes students who are pursuing any major program of study at Kennesaw State! It helps students to achieve many career and professional goals.

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The Art History minor program welcomes students who are pursuing any major program of study at Kennesaw State! In their art-historical coursework, our students learn about visual culture from a range of periods, regions, and cultures, and they develop skills in critical thinking, communication, and global engagement. Our minor program therefore helps students to achieve many career and professional goals. We also invite them to explore their art-historical interests with the Kennesaw State Art History Club.

Required Courses

Students must complete eighteen (18) credit hours of coursework:
ARH 2750:
History of Ancient through Medieval Art
ARH 2850:
History of Renaissance through Modern Art 12 additional credit hours in art history at the 3000 or 4000 level

Please note: Students electing an Art History minor who are also in the BFA in Art or BS in Art Education degree programs must take 12 additional art history credits beyond those required for their degrees. These additional credits may count only as free electives in their degree programs.

Classical Studies Minor

This interdisciplinary minor program in the language, culture, and society of Greece and Rome includes courses in anthropology, art history, dance, English, history, Latin, music, philosophy, and theatre and performance studies.

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Overview

The Acropolis

Sponsored by the School of Art & Design (College of the Arts) and the Department of Foreign Languages (College of Humanities and Social Sciences), Classical Studies is an interdisciplinary minor program in the language, culture, and society of Greece and Rome. It includes courses in anthropology, art history, dance, English, history, Latin, music, philosophy, and theatre and performance studies. Faculty members affiliated with Classical Studies are committed to training students, pursue a range of classical teaching and research interests, and do extensive fieldwork at classical sites and museums. The faculty is happy to help students construct programs that are best suited to their needs.

This minor offers students an opportunity to learn important and highly respected skills. The classical Greek and Roman world encompassed Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, North Africa, and many other areas in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Since antiquity, the classical tradition has survived in both Western and Non-Western cultures throughout all regions of the globe. The minor therefore provides students with both historical and global perspectives. Most importantly, the minor can hone students’ skills in critical thinking, writing, and creativity, making them more competitive in the job market and better prepared for careers in many fields. Employers and graduate admissions officers recognize and value the significance of a Classical Studies minor!

Kennesaw State University is a Cooperating Institution of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece.

Possible Careers
Archaeology
Business
Colleges and Universities
Pre-K-12 Education
Journalism
Law
Libraries
Medicine
Museums
Performing Arts
Public Service
Publishing
Religious Institutions
Visual Arts
Writing

Requirements

Students must complete fifteen (15) credit hours of coursework in Classical Studies.  At least twelve (12) hours cannot duplicate coursework for their majors, and at least nine (9) hours must be at the upper-division (3000-4000) level.

Students must choose one (1) course from the following:

Course Designator
& Number
Course Title Prerequisites
ARH 2750 Ancient-Medieval Art None
HIST 3337 Greek and Roman History HIST 1110

Students must choose an additional four (4) courses from the following, with no more than one (1) directed study:

Course Designator
& Number
Course Title Prerequisites
ANTH 2201 Introduction to Anthropology None
ANTH 3305 Principles of Archeology ANTH 2201
ARH 2750 Ancient-Medieval Art None
ARH 3300 Ancient Egyptian Art ARH 2750
ARH 3320 Ancient Near Eastern Art ARH 2750 or instructor’s permission
ARH 3350 Art of Ancient Greece ARH 2750 or instructor’s permission
ARH 3370 Roman Art and Architecture ARH 2750 or instructor’s permission
DANC 2000 Dance History I None
ENGL 3232 Topics in Drama [if classical/classical tradition] ENGL 2110
ENGL 4240 Rhetorical Theory ENGL 2110
ENGL 4380 World Literature before 1800 ENGL 2145
HIST 3337 Greek and Roman History HIST 1110
LATN 1001 Introduction to Latin Language and Culture I None
LATN 1002 Introduction to Latin Language and Culture II None
Note: Students cannot apply this to the minor if they use it to satisfy General Education Area B requirements
LATN 2001 Intermediate Latin Language and Culture I LATN 1002
LATN 2002 Intermediate Latin Language and Culture II LATN 2001
LATN 3500 Topics in Latin Epic Poetry
[authors vary; may be repeated for credit]
LATN 2002 or
instructor's permission
LATN 4490 Special Topics
[authors vary; may be repeated for credit]
LATN 2001
LATN 4500 Topics in Latin Prose
[authors vary; may be repeated for credit]
LATN 3500 or
instructor's permission
MUSI 3311 History of Music I MUSI 1107 and MUSI 2222
PHIL 3310 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy ENGL 1102
PHIL 4450 Major Figures in Philosophy
[if classical/classical tradition]
ENGL 1102
TPS 3094 Performing Classical Myth ENGL 2110 or TPS 1600
TPS 4513 History and Theory I: Ancient through Renaissance Theatre and Performance TPS major, TPS 3000, and TPS 3403

Any department’s 4400 Directed Study, if the focus of the class is relevant to Classical Studies and it is approved by the Classical Studies advisor

Any department’s 4490 Special Topics, if the focus of the class is relevant to Classical Studies and it is approved by the Classical Studies advisor (topics vary; may be repeated for credit)

Study abroad credit, if the focus is relevant to Classical Studies and it is approved by the Classical Studies advisor

Transfer credit, if the focus is relevant to Classical Studies and it is approved by the Classical Studies advisor

People

Model of the House of the Faun at Pompeii by KSU Student Joseph Barbier
Model of the House of the Faun at Pompeii by KSU Student Joseph Barbier

Program Coordinator

Kristen Seaman
School of Art & Design
(678) 797-2189
kseaman1@kennesaw.edu
VA101A

Affiliated Faculty

Jane Barnette
Department of Theatre & Performance Studies

Beth Daniell
 Department of English

Edward Eanes
 School of Music

Gregory Ewing
 Department of Foreign Languages

John Gentile
 Department of Theatre & Performance Studies

M. Todd Harper
 Department of English

David Jones
 Department of History and Philosophy

Mark Kremer
 Department of Political Science and International Affairs

Kristen Seaman
 School of Art & Design

Howard Shealy
 Department of History and Philosophy

Susan Kirkpatrick Smith
 Department of Geography and Anthropology

Jessica Stephenson
 School of Art & Design

Resources

Greek and Roman Art in Atlanta

Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University
http://www.carlos.emory.edu/

Professional Organizations

American Philological Association
http://www.apaclassics.org/

Archaeological Institute of America
http://www.archaeological.org/

Classical Association of the Middle West and South
http://www.camws.org/

Georgia Classical Association
http://www.gaclass.org/WebUI/home.aspx

Study Abroad and Archaeological Opportunities

American Academy in Rome
http://www.aarome.org/

American School of Classical Studies at Athens
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/

College Year in Athens
http://www.cyathens.org/

Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies
http://studyabroad.duke.edu/home/Programs/Semester/ICCS_Rome

Kennesaw State University’s Education Abroad Office
http://www.kennesaw.edu/studyabroad/

Intensive Summer Programs in Greek and Latin

City University of New York
http://web.gc.cuny.edu/lginst/

University of California at Berkeley
http://classics.berkeley.edu/courses/greekLatinWorkshops.php

University of Chicago
https://summer.uchicago.edu/course-listings.cfm?r=1

University of Georgia
http://www.classics.uga.edu/academic_programs/summer_institute.htm


Post-Baccalaureate Programs in Classics

Columbia University
http://ce.columbia.edu/Postbaccalaureate-Studies/Classics-Certificate-Programs

Georgetown University
http://classics.georgetown.edu/postbac.html

University of California at Davis
http://extension.ucdavis.edu/certificates/post-baccalaureate_certificate_program_in_classics/

University of California at Los Angeles
http://www.classics.ucla.edu/index.php/post-baccalaureate-certificate-program

University of Iowa
http://www.uiowa.edu/~classics/programs/postbacc/postbaccalaureate.html

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
http://classics.unc.edu/academics/post-baccalaureate

University of Pennsylvania
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/postbac/classics

News

Faculty News

Classical Studies Poster imageJane Barnette participated in the 2013 Mellon School of Theater and Performance Research at Harvard University.

Beth Daniell (with Letizia Guglielmo) presented "Changing Audience, Changing Ethos" at the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference at Stanford University.

David Jones is the 2012-2013 recipient of Kennesaw State’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences Distinguished Research and Creative Activity Award and the 2013 recipient of the Kennesaw State University Foundation Distinguished Research and Creative Activity Award. He also was Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences at National Taiwan University.

Mark Kremer published “Introduction: Symposium on Blitz’s Plato’s Political Philosophy,” Perspectives on Political Science 42 (2013). He also presented “Honor and Founding: A Study of Usurpation and Consolidation of Authority” at the 2013 Annual Conference of the Association for Core Texts and Courses in Ottawa, Canada. He will teach for Kennesaw State’s study abroad program in Montepulciano, Italy during Summer 2014.

Kristen Seaman presented “The Local Perspective on Graeco-Roman Classicism in Gandharan Sculpture” at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, WA; “Rhetoric and Cross-cultural Exchange in Gandharan Sculpture” at the 2013 College Art Association Conference in New York, NY; and “Greek Rhetoric and Insular Cultural Production in the Hellenistic World” at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research in Baltimore, MD. She also was the Haines Morris Distinguished Lecturer in Classics at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, where she discussed “Cultural Interaction (and Reaction) in the Courtly Art of the Hellenistic World” and “Art History and Criticism in Ancient Greece.”

Susan Kirkpatrick Smith began the analysis of the human skeletal remains from a Roman cemetery outside of modern Irapetra on the southeast coast of Crete during Summer 2013. She also presented a poster ("Conflicting Evidence of Warfare in Mycenaean Athens Greece: Bodies Versus Bronzes”) at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. And she has been selected to teach for Kennesaw State’s study abroad program in Montepulciano, Italy during Summer 2014.

Student News

Lauren Bearden received a 2013 Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Funding Award from Kennesaw State’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, and she graduated in May 2013 with a major in Art History and a minor in Classical Studies. She began post-baccalaureate study in Latin and German at Georgia State University in Fall 2013. In addition, she presented papers at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, WA (“Hybridization and Nabataean Identity in the Khazneh Façade at Petra”), the 2013 Southeastern College Art Conference in Greensboro, NC (“Aniconism in Ancient Petra”), and the 2013 Collage Colloquium at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, GA (“Nabataean Aesthetics: Dueling Imagery at Petra in Ancient Jordan”), where she won the Best Paper Award. She also participated in Kennesaw State’s 2013 Symposium of Student Scholars, and she worked at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University.

Alumna Kandie Black finished her MSc in Roman Archaeology at the University of Nottingham.

Joshua A. Brook (“YOU SQUEAL LIKE A…HUMAN”), Emily Cown (“Ancient Athenian Women: How Much Did They See?”), Veronica D. Hernandez (“Interpretations of Plato’s Ion”), Anterior Leverett (“Helen of Troy: The King Bey of Ancient Greece”), and Abbey Sanders (“Creating a Monster: Work of a Classical Author”) presented classical papers at Kennesaw State’s 2013 Chautauqua/Colloquium events that were organized by Professor Jane Barnette.

Jane Custer presented “An Approachable God: Hermes in the Temple of Hera at Olympia, Greece” at the 2013 Collage Colloquium at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, GA.

Sarah Jane Eller is majoring in English Education with a minor in Classical Studies. She observed Latin classes at Mount Paran Christian School in Fall 2013 for her field experience requirement in Education. This is her fourteenth year of Latin coursework, and she also has studied Italian.
Jasmine Johnson graduated in December 2013 with a major in History (World History concentration) and a minor in Classical Studies.

Kelci Ragsdale and April Tolley worked with Professor Susan Kirkpatrick Smith on the analysis of the human skeletal remains from a Roman cemetery outside of modern Irapetra, Crete during Summer 2013.

Logan Winn is a History major with a concentration in World History and a minor in Classical Studies. He takes Latin and has a special interest in Roman history. He is a member of several honors societies including: Phi Alpha Theta National History Honor Society, National Society of Leadership, Sigma Alpha Pi National Political Science Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society, and Delta Epsilon Iota Academic Honor Society. In addition, he is part of the leadership team for Intervarsity Christian Fellowship at Kennesaw State. He plans to study abroad in Italy during Summer 2014.

FACEBOOK

MAT Art

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Art program is offered to meet the increasing demand for alternative initial certification routes of individuals already holding one of the following:
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts degree
  • Professional undergraduate education degree in art
  • Bachelor of Arts
  • Bachelor of Science degree with a major in visual art
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Overview

Beginning in Summer, 2009 the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Art program will be offered to meet the increasing demand for alternative initial certification routes of individuals already holding one of the following:

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts degree
  • Professional undergraduate education degree in art
  • Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with a major in visual art
Expertise within the field of art will be demonstrated through a portfolio review process. The MAT Art is a 48-credit hour program aligned with MAT programs previously established in the Bagwell College of Education.

Unique program aspects include the following:
The MAT Art is based on the Comprehensive Arts Education model, focusing on the areas of production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics.

This program is aligned with the five standards defined by the National Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) as recognized in Rule 505-3-.11 Art Education Program in the State of Georgia. The program is also aligned to the six skills areas defined by the National Art Education Association (NAEA) Standards. These standards along with the Georgia Quality Core Curriculum serve as the foundation for the primary objectives of the program.

This research-oriented program will emphasize theoretical studies and research projects in art education, with at least 15 semester hours required in art education and associated research areas to meet NASAD standards. It will also emphasize the gathering and processing of cutting edge information within the field of art education as well as a focus on diversity, global awareness and creativity.

The design of the program employs a series of practica in diverse settings, complemented by courses in which candidates will participate in reflection and dialogue, informed by their field experience and relevant research and guided by peers, mentor teachers, and faculty. Each semester of the five-semester program is designed around a theme.
  • Semester I – The Learner: Development, Psychology, and Diversity
  • Semester II – The Learner in the School: Curriculum, Assessment, and Management
  • Semester III – Teaching in Schools: Contemporary Issues in Art Education
  • Semester IV – The Teacher as a Professional: Reflective Inquiry, Research and Presentation of Artist Portfolio
  • Semester V – Teacher as Leader: Presentation of Research and Professional Educational Portfolio


Curriculum

SUMMER I

EDUC 6110: Adolescent Development and Learning (3 credits)
EDUC 6120: Diversity and Exceptionality (3 credits)
ARED 7705: Contemporary Issues in Visual Arts (3 credits)
ARED 6200: Curriculum, Assessment, & Classroom Management (3 credits)

FALL I

ARED 7704: Intercultural Art Education
ARED 6250: Materials, Methods, & Management for Art Classrooms P-5 (3 credits)
ARED 6251: Materials, Methods, & Management for Art Classrooms 6-12 (3 credits)
ARED 7702: Inclusion in Art Education (3 credits)

SPRING I

ARED 7701: Special Topics in Art Education (3 credits)
ARED 7706: Theory & Criticism in Art Education (3 credits)
ARED 6200L: Art Education Practicum II (3 credits)


SUMMER II

ARED 7720: Research in Art Education (3 credits)
ARED 7703: Technology & Computer Applications (3 credits)

FALL II

ARED 6300L: Art Education Practicum III (6 credits)
(Deadline for field placement is January 30. See CEPP website for application/requirements)

ARED 7730: Art Education Portfolio (3 credits)

TOTAL 48 CREDITS: 15 courses – 48 hours in 5 semesters


Courses

Summer I


EDUC 6110 - Adolescent Development and Learning
3 class hours | 2 lab hours | 3 credit hours
A study of life span development (with an emphasis on adolescents and young adults) addressing social, moral, emotional, physical, cognitive, and psychological development. Theories and principles of learning and motivation are examined and related to development. A 30-hour field experience is required in this course.

EDUC 6120 - Diversity and Exceptionality
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
This course examines the demographic changes in America’s schools that influence teaching and learning. Attention is given to assisting candidates in developing a socio-cultural consciousness and the disposition that all students. Including those with disabilities can learn complex content. Candidates engage in in-depth study of students with disabilities and their educational needs as well as the creation of culturally responsive and inclusive classrooms that support all students.

ARED 7705 - Contemporary Issues in Visual Arts
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Historical and contemporary developments in the field of art education are presented, as a means to compose a teaching philosophy relevant to today’s art classrooms. In-depth exploration results in the integration of concepts and issues to create a comprehensive view of the field. Social, psychological, affective and psychomotor components of learning relevant to art education are a primary focus. Multicultural and inclusive content is included. Technological applications include the use of word processing, electronic portfolio development, presentation applications, and Internet research.
ARED 6200 - Curriculum, Assessment, Classroom Management in Art Education
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Candidates will explore techniques of the Discipline Based Art Education model including art production, art history, art criticism and aesthetics. This online and classroom course is designed to prepare art teachers to plan and organize effective art programs and curricula, to explore innovative and exemplary art programs, and to develop a rationale and strategy for articulating and promoting a quality art program. Candidates will explore how effective use of a variety of assessment techniques to evaluate teaching and learning promotes visual literacy.

Fall I


ARED 7704: Intercultural Art Education
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
This course involves an exposure to art education literature that focuses on diversity issues in historical and contemporary contexts (including ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, sexual orientation and geography). Theories and models of contemporary art education practice are explored that strengthens the respect proper to all classroom diversities. Candidates will develop a concrete understanding of the importance of embracing an intercultural approach to art education then design culturally-based lessons on a chosen culture that will be adapted for a variety of diverse student populations.

ARED 6250 - Materials, Methods & Management for Art Education Classrooms P-5
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Specific strategies focus on differentiating developmental, behavioral, and managerial aspects relevant to best practices in the field of art education. Focus will be on advanced concepts and applications of method and materials for P-5 art classrooms. On-line and in class work involves development and analysis of art lessons including the development of related art projects for P-5 classrooms. Candidates are expected to display advanced skills in planning, organizing, and sequencing art lessons that are developmentally appropriate.

ARED 6251 - Materials, Methods, & Management for Art Education Classrooms 6-12
3 Class Hours 0 | Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Specific strategies focus on differentiating developmental, behavioral, and managerial aspects relevant to best practices in the field of art education. Focus will be on advanced concepts and applications of method and materials for 6-12 art classrooms. On-line and in class work involves development and analysis of art lessons including the development of related art projects for 6-12 classrooms. Candidates are expected to display advanced skills in planning, organizing, and sequencing art lessons that are developmentally appropriate.

ARED 7702 - Inclusion in Art Education
2 Class Hours | 2 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Course includesin-depth coverage of diagnostic categories, historical aspects, legal issues and art applications for students with exceptionalities. In addition to on-line course work, candidates develop and implement differentiated lessons for an inclusive art classroom. Primary expectations focus on the candidate’s ability to utilize Individualized Education Plans as a means to promote the inclusion and success of all students through relevant adaptations of content, materials, and workspace. Candidates should plan to spend three hours per week in the field. Verification of Liability Insurance is required.

Spring I


ARED 7701 - Special Topics in Art Education
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Emerging issues in the field of art education will be explored on a semester-by-semester basis. Through the examination of historical and contemporary art forms, candidates understand how aesthetic theories allow greater understanding of the quality, nature and value of diverse works of art, cultural art forms and visual culture. Candidates comprehend how all works of art have meaning including those from literature, theatre, dance, music and other subject areas thus revealing lessons about life, its paradoxes, contradictions, harmonies, unattractiveness, and beauty.

ARED 7706 - Theory & Criticism in Art Education
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Candidates will understand theory and criticism in art education by researching, critically reading and interpreting works of art within a historical/cultural context. Theories and models of contemporary art education practice are explored, which strengthen the respect proper to all classroom diversities. In addition to on-line course work, classroom work is required to carry out directed activities.

ARED 6200L - Art Education Practicum II
0 Class Hours | 9 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
This field experience is designed to provide the candidate with the opportunity to apply and reflect on concepts addressed in the pre-requisite course ARED 6200, Teaching Comprehensive Art Education. Candidates will be placed in appropriate school settings where they will carry out directed activities. Candidates will spend approximately nine hours per week in the field. Candidates must have a satisfactory practicum to continue in the MAT Art Education program without remediation. Verification of Liability Insurance is required.

Summer II


ARED 7720 - Research in Art Education
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Candidates examine research methodologies in art education focusing on qualitative and quantitative research methods and designs, and interpretations and applications relative to classroom practices. This advanced course is designed to prepare art teachers to effective plan and evaluate art programs and curricula, to explore innovative and exemplary art programs, to assess art learning, and to develop a rationale and strategy for articulating and promoting a quality art program. Candidates will understand how effective use of a variety of assessment techniques to evaluate teaching and learning promotes visual literacy. Topics include interactive discussion about literature critiques, professional organizations, and legal issues.

ARED 7703 - Technology & Computer Applications
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
Candidates will focus on the identification and exploration of the use of current technologies including presentation applications, Internet research, online courseware, electronic portfolio, computer applications relating to the production of art including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and other programs. This course will offer art education majors the discipline-specific knowledge and skills necessary to identify, develop, and deliver effective instructional and management techniques in an art classroom.

Fall II


ARED 6300L - Art Education Practicum III
0 Class Hours | 18 Laboratory Hours | 6 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone experience for the Master of Arts of Teaching Art. Candidates will analyze how visual art teachers become creative choice-makers, reflective practitioners, and researchers forming curricular and instructional methods and strategies based on effective and efficient use of contemporary, intellectual and pedagogical resources. A teaching portfolio will be initiated on-line, focusing on strategies appropriate to educational connoisseurship. Emphasis will be placed on an extended internship in the art classroom. An exit portfolio will highlight the candidate's success as an educator of all art disciplines, thus illustrating the important career choice actualized by the intern. This course serves as a capstone experience toward initial certification in art education. Candidates should plan to spend 18 hours per week in the classroom. Verification of Liability of Insurance is required.

ARED 7730 - Art Education Portfolio
3 Class Hours | 0 Laboratory Hours | 3 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone experience for the MAT. Candidates work independently under the supervision of the course instructor and the portfolio committee. The purpose of constructing the portfolio is to implement a systematic, reflection-in action approach to the candidate’s development as an art expert, facilitator of learning, and a collaborative professional. The portfolio documents this process as well as the candidate’s development as a teacher-researcher through the presentation and analysis of the research project. Technology utilized in this course may include imaging, online course environments, presentation applications, and electric portfolio development.

Portfolio Requirements


Content

The portfolio is composed of photographic images of your artwork. A total of twenty still images and/or moving images should be submitted. The MAT Art degree is based on the Comprehensive Arts Education model, focusing on the areas of production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. The program is also aligned with the five standards defined by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) as recognized in Rule 505-3-.11 Art Education Program in the State of Georgia. Thus, the portfolio should reflect art competencies in various media including but not limited to: drawing, painting, photography, graphic design, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, computer images, models, mechanical drawings, or any other art work.


Format

Portfolios should be submitted as Powerpoint files. The file name should be the candidate’s name, last name first (“Smith Jane.ppt”). Images should be of high enough resolution to be crisp and clear. Poor image quality will negatively affect the evaluation of your portfolio. Standard 4x3 page setup is preferred, and background color should be black. Any moving images should use a commonly available player and be embedded in the Powerpoint file and should be no longer than two minutes.

All submissions must be on a CD or DVD that is Macintosh-readable. Disks should be sent in paper sleeves with your name legibly printed on the disks, the sleeves, and the envelope. If you would like your CDs or DVDs returned, you must include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Portfolios without self-addressed, stamped envelopes will be held for 1 year after notification. If still unclaimed, the portfolio will be discarded.

Labeling

Each Powerpoint “slide” should be labeled at the bottom or left side in white 12-point Arial with the following information. Do NOT include your name with the individual images.

Title (titles are italicized, not put in quotation marks)
Dimensions (height, width--and depth for 3-D works)
Medium (only if the medium of the original work is photography should it be listed as such)
Year work was made

Examples:

Untitled Figure Study
18” X 24”
Charcoal on newsprint
2007

Montana Plains
8” X 10”
Photography--film negative, digital print
2006

Untitled
10’ X 8’ X 12’
Sculptural installation--steel, wire screen, & electronics
2006

Working with Time
24” X 36”
Digital media—Photoshop, Illustrator (screen capture)
2006

Glass Bottle Study
16” X 20”
Oil on canvas
2006

Anna Goodwin
12” X 16”
Pencil on paper
2007.

Evaluation Criteria

The portfolio review committee has determined that the following criteria be used to review portfolios:
  • Composition – Emphasis, focal point, eye movement, and balance
  • Craftsmanship – Basic fine motor skill and attention to detail
  • Conceptual Inventiveness – Effort to communicate and creativity
Each of these criteria will be assigned a value from the list below by the faculty reviewer:
  • Excellent – roughly equivalent to an A (4.0) grade
  • Good – roughly equivalent to a B (3.0) grade
  • Adequate – roughly equivalent to a C (2.0) grade
  • Weak – roughly equivalent to a D (1.0) grade
  • None – used if evidence of criteria is not evident or applicable
The Art Education Admission Committee will use this information in making the final decision regarding whether an applicant will be accepted as a MAT Art candidate.