Apply and Submit Portfolio

arts clinic photography 
A student shoots a landscape photo using a large format camera.

Admission to the Art Major

(BFA in Art, BFA in Digital Animation and BS in Art Education)

The School of Art & Design admits students in the Fall (August) and Spring (January) semester each year. We offer three degree programs for which you must submit a portfolio of work for entrance: The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Digital Animation and the Bachelor of Science in Art Education. Scroll down for entrance information about admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Art History and the MAT in Teaching Art.

NOTE: Only five studio art classes can be taken prior to admission as a major: 

  • ART 1100 – Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory
  • ART 1150 – Drawing I
  • ART 1200 – Three-Dimensional Design
  • ART 2550 – Computer Applications in Art
  • ART 2990 – Concept, Creativity, and Studio Practice

Entrance Portfolio Submission Deadlines

(For transfer students, current students or new, incoming first-year students)

Completed applications must be submitted by 5 p.m. on the following dates each year:

FOR SPRING TERM ACCEPTANCE:
August 1
October 1
November 15

FOR FALL TERM ACCEPTANCE:
February 1
April 15 

Portfolios submitted after 5 p.m. on these dates will not be reviewed until the next possible submission date. Approximately 3 weeks are required from the time we receive your portfolio to complete the review. 

APPLY NOW

  • 1. If you have not already done so, submit your application for admission to the university. (The KSU Admissions Page has a link to the application with instructions.) Be sure to list Art, Digital Animation or Art Education as your intended major on the application.

    2. Click the “Apply Now” link below to create your application to the School of Art & Design. In order to complete the application, you will need the following:

    • Your KSU ID Number

    • Digital images (see acceptable formats below) of 10 of your best works showing at least two (2) different media. These may include but are not limited to the following: 2D Design, Book Arts, Ceramics, Computer Illustration, Craft, Digital media, Drawing, Fiber Arts, Graphic Design, Metalsmithing, Mixed Media, Painting, Performance Art, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, and Video.

    • NOTE: If you include 3-D work, you must submit two images of each piece photographed from different perspectives, e.g., a front and side shot. The filename for each image should conform to the following format:

    Title-Media.extension

    For example:

    Untitled-Charcoal.jpg 
    JPG is preferred file type for still images.

    Graphic-Novel-Digital-Illustration.pdf 
    PDF works well for multiple-page graphic design or illustration documents.

    Working-With-Time-Digital-Media.mp4 
    MP4 is preferred for short film or animation projects.

    Kinetic-Sculpture-Animated.gif 
    GIF is okay for short animations of moving objects—this is rare and viewable only on Web browsers. Put "animated" in file name. 

    • The file size for each image/document should not exceed 1500 KB (Except for PDF and MP4 files).
    • Images should have sharp focus and should exclude distracting background elements.
    • Resolution of images should not exceed 3000 pixels in either the height or the width dimension.
    • DO NOT include any personal information on the images or in the filenames. 

    Portfolios that do not adhere to these requirements or that are unable to be viewed by our faculty will not be reviewed.

    Applicants to Art Education will also be required to:

    • Provide the email addresses of four individuals who can provide professional letters of recommendation that address the student's potential for success in the program and as a teacher. These individuals should not be friends or family members.

    Studio Art Credit Earned Prior to Enrolling at KSU

    It is possible to substitute credit earned prior to enrolling for specific KSU studio art degree requirements. This credit can be earned in one of two ways:

    • By taking one or more of the AP Studio Art Exams (Two-Dimensional Design, Three-Dimensional Design, or Drawing), or
    • By taking studio art courses at another institution

    In either case, you must submit work to be reviewed by our faculty before a determination can be made whether substitution is possible. This review can take place at the same time as your application to the major, or after you have been formally accepted to the School of Art & Design.


    To request a review of credit based on the AP Studio Art Exam, you must do the following:

    • Earn a score of 4 or higher on the exam
    • Submit a minimum of four images that demonstrate your highest level of proficiency in the media from each course. For example, if you are requesting credit for 3-Dimensional Design, you must submit four images of 3D work. These can be included in, or in addition to the 10 works required for the entrance portfolio.

    The courses eligible for substitution based on an AP score are:

    • ART 1100 Two-Dimensional Design & Color Theory
    • ART 1150 Drawing I
    • ART 1200 3-Dimensional Design

    A substitution will only be approved based on receipt of an official score report from the College Board showing that a 4 or higher was earned on the relevant exam, and after successful determination by the faculty of the School of Art & Design or equivalent proficiency.

    To request a review of credit based on studio courses taken at another college or university, you must do the following:

    Submit a minimum of four images that demonstrate your highest level of proficiency in the media from each course. For example, if you are requesting credit for Printmaking I, you must submit four printmaking images. These can be included in, or in addition to the 10 works required for the entrance portfolio.

    Transfer equivalency will be granted based on approval by the Office of the Registrar, a minimum grade of “C” or better in an equivalent course, and successful determination by the faculty of the School of Art & Design of equivalent proficiency.

    It is strongly recommended that you review the course descriptions in the Undergraduate Catalog for information about the content of these courses before completing the application.

    IMPORTANT: Please contact us at COTA_ARCS@kennesaw.edu before you submit your portfolio if you are requesting credit for ART 2550 Computer Applications in Art.

    • Dalton Blue Goblets
      Brad Dalton, Eleven Blue Goblets, 8-11 in. X 2.5-3.5 in. glazed clay forms

      Criteria for Entrance Portfolio Review

      BFA Applicants

      The Entrance Portfolio Review for applicants to the Bachelor of Fine Arts consists of a blind review of all images submitted. Each application will be reviewed by a minimum of two members of the Portfolio Review Committee, who will then score the portfolio based on the following criteria: 

      Conceptual Inventiveness: Creativity and effort to communicate
      Design and Composition: Emphasis, focal point, eye movement, economy, balance, and demonstrated problem-solving ability
      Representation of Form: Accurate description of subject matter based on perceptive reality and visual observation
      Craftsmanship: Basic fine motor skill and attention to detail.

      The scores assigned to each criterion will range from 4, or Excellent (equivalent to an A) to 0, or None (equivalent to an E). An average of these four scores is then taken, and when there is significant disagreement between the first two reviewers, a third review is conducted. Acceptance decisions are based upon these scores.

      Art Education Applicants

      The entire art education faculty will review all images submitted by applicants to the Bachelor of Science in Art Education and the Master of Arts in Teaching Art in a blind review process. The criteria and scoring for this review of images is the same as for applicants to the BFA as described above. In addition, art education candidates will be evaluated on the following:

      Written Communication: How well you communicate your thoughts and ideas in writing using correct style and grammar
      Academic Record: Your overall academic performance (grades in high school and, where applicable, college and test scores).
      Content: How well the content of the application (written statements, artwork, interview, and academic record) demonstrates your commitment to your work as an artist
      Pedagogy, Strategies, and Philosophies: How well the content of the application (written statements, artwork, interview, and academic record) demonstrates your commitment to being an educator.

      As with the BFA, the scores assigned to each criterion will range from 4, or Excellent (equivalent to an A) to 0, or None (equivalent to an E). An average is then taken, and acceptance decisions are based upon these scores.

    •  
      • Only five studio art classes can be taken prior to admission as a major: 

        • ART 1100 – Two-Dimensional Design and Color Theory
        • ART 1150 – Drawing I
        • ART 1200 – Three-Dimensional Design
        • ART 2550 – Computer Applications in Art
        • ART 2990 – Concept, Creativity, and Studio Practice

        For first-time, full-time freshmen, the ART 1100 and ART 1150 courses can be found as part of a learning community, or they can be taken separately. If you are interested in taking either of these courses, you need to contact the School of Art & Design and have your major changed to “Art-Interest.” NOTE: Successful performance in either of these two courses does not guarantee admission as a major.

      • All decisions will be communicated via email. If you are currently enrolled as a KSU student, this will be sent to your students.kennesaw.edu email address. All other communications will be sent to the address you indicate on your application. If you are admitted to the School of Art & Design, your admission email will include a link to an Intent to Enroll Form that you can use to declare your intention to accept the offer of admission. Please respond to this by the deadline indicated in your admission email.

      • Portfolio reviews typically take about three weeks. If you are requesting a review of coursework taken before you applied to KSU, this may take a bit longer. We will make every effort to notify you of the results of your application as soon as possible.

      • Yes, there is no limit to the number of times that you can apply for admission to the School of Art & Design. The only consideration is the effect this might have on your goals for time to graduation.

      • First, congratulations! AP classes are excellent preparation for college level work, so you should be commended for challenging yourself in high school. If you took any of the AP courses listed above and scored a 4 or 5 on the associated AP exam, you may be eligible to receive credit toward a specific KSU course. For art history, all you need do is have an official copy of your AP score reported to the university, and the Registrar’s Office will grant you credit for two classes: ARH 2750, Ancient through Medieval Art and ARH 2850, Renaissance through Modern Art. In order to receive credit for 2-Dimensional Design and Color Theory (ART 1100), Drawing I (ART 1150), and/or 3-Dimensional Design (ART 1200) not only do you need to provide an official score report, but you must submit a portfolio of work for our faculty to review. They will determine whether the proficiency level you demonstrate in your portfolio is equivalent to that we would expect of from a KSU student who has completed that course. If, for some reason, they determine that you still need to take one of these courses, your AP credit can be used to fulfill elective requirements in your KSU degree. Click here for a complete list of credit you can receive based on AP coursework.

      • This is a two-step process. First, the Office of the Registrar will determine whether or not the course credit is eligible to transfer. This is dependent upon it being taken at a regionally accredited institution and that you received a passing grade in the course. Click here for more information about how the Registrar evaluates transfer credit. Most studio art courses that meet this standard will be assigned elective credit in your record, and flagged with a “T” in your Owl Express record (e.g., ART 1T00). Once this happens, it is up to our faculty to determine how these classes may or may not be substituted for specific KSU courses. This determination is made based upon their review of the images you submit in your portfolio. For example, if you took a basic drawing course at your previous institution and got a B, and the faculty determine that you demonstrate sufficient drawing proficiency to move on to the next level of drawing, they will approve a substitution for Drawing I. If, for some reason, they determine that you need to repeat Drawing I, you can work with your advisor to find a way that your basic drawing course may be used for elective credit, but you would still need to take Drawing I to fulfill that specific requirement. Our rule of thumb is to “trust, but verify:” we want to give you as much opportunity to substitute previous coursework for KSU requirements as possible, but also make sure that you have the requisite skills to be successful in the courses you will take here.

      • No, there isn’t; we really want you to choose art that best represents what you can do and who you are as an artist. Examples of student artwork by our current students are available on our web site.

      • Yes! Aside from the useful guide to photographing your artwork below, students with a KSU NetID can make an appointment with personnel at our Visual Arts Mac Lab & Resource Center if unable to achieve desired results alone.

      More Questions?

      Visit the College of the Arts 
      Academic Resource Center for Students

      Room 209 of the Wilson Bldg.
      Kennesaw State University
      471Bartow Avenue, MD#3101
      Kennesaw GA 30144-5591 
      470-578-6614

      People to address:
      Samuel Robinson, Assistant Dean and Director, srobin50@kennesaw.edu
      Christine Collins, Associate Director, ccolli61@kennesaw.edu

      • Portfolio images should be crisp and clear. Attention to the following three things will help when determining whether your digital images are good enough for your portfolio:

        Pixel dimensions should be greater than 2000px in both width and height—even after cropping
        Camera is stabilized with a tripod or set on a stable surface when the shutter button is pressed
        Camera's focus is on the artwork and not background elements

        thumbnail image of FAQ and portfolio tips sheetDownload a PDF of faq's and quick-tips specific to your portfolio images. 

      • Point-and-Shoot and Consumer-level DSLR Digital Camera Operation

        A consumer-level digital point-and-shoot camera with good lens clarity and a 5 megapixels or greater capture sensor should work fine for photographing two and three dimensional artworks. Of course, scanned images may also be used as long as the dimensions after appropriate cropping is still 1000 pixels or greater for both width and height dimensions. If using a camera, make sure the lense if free of smudges and dust by using a microfiber cloth (no scratching paper material). If scanning, make sure the scanner's glass is clean.

        Camera Flash

        Always keep the flash off when taking photos of artwork. In low light situations, use a tripod to stabilize the camera during shooting and to avoid the effects of camera shake. This is especially true when taking photographs of three-dimensional items since an in-camera flash tends to flatten out the form.

        Prevent Blur with Proper Focus

        Automatic focus is usually activated by lightly pressing and holding the shutter button while pointing to the subject. The shutter button should remain slightly pressed until completely pressed when capturing the image. The area being focused, depending on the camera, is usually indicated by a crosshair or rectangle on the viewfinder, and it will either beep or turn green when a good focus is made. If your camera is having trouble focusing on your subject, try pointing the crosshair to an area that is of high contrast on the subject.

        Aperture 

        The opening through which rays of light travel. The larger the opening the more rays of light are allowed through resulting in a less clear image accept where the lens is focusing. The smaller the opening, the lesser and more orderly the light rays enter through the hole, resulting in a more crisp image—or a greater depth of field.

        Shutter Speed

        The amount of time that light is allowed through to expose an image.
        Depth of Field: The amount of sharpness achieved on subjects at different distances within the same image. A greater depth of field is created when less light is allowed into the camera for a given amount of time. A smaller aperture (higher number) makes objects of various distances in the same shot more likely to be in focus—even only one object is targeted to be in focus.

        Shooting Modes

        Since Auto Mode can have different effects on different cameras, it is recommended to use one of the following camera settings instead—usually set by turning a dial. By changing the setting to one of the modes listed here, one will be able to change the ISO Sensitivity and White Balance (See below)— both important for shooting artwork.

        • “P” for Program: Most cameras have a Program mode which allows for an automatic aperture/shutter speed exposure setting while being able to change other settings. For instance if the aperture is set to its lowest setting, the shutter speed will automatically adjust for a good exposure.
        • “A” for Aperture-Priority: Setting the Aperture to a low number (making the amount of light allowed through greater but the depth of field lower) will make your shutter speed automatically faster. The faster the shutter speed, the less likely you will have a blurred image from camera shake or vibration. Use of a tripod should eliminate the any blurring issue as long as the camera is achieving a good focus.
        • “S” for Shutter-Priority: Setting the shutter speed low (making the amount of time light is allowed through longer) will make your aperture automatically a greater number (a smaller amount—allowing for a greater depth of field). The faster the shutter speed, the less likely you will have a blurred image from camera shake or vibration. Use of a tripod should eliminate the any blurring issue as long as the camera is achieving a good focus.
        • “M” for Manual: In this setting, you have full control over the exposure. On most digital cameras, your viewfinder or display screen will preview the lightness or darkness of the exposure before you press the shutter button. Using this setting you may keep the aperture wide open and adjust your exposure by taking several shots with different shutter speeds. 

        Setting the Exposure

        Always keep the flash off when taking photos of artwork. In low light situations, use a tripod to stabilize the camera during shooting and to avoid the effects of camera shake.

        Resolution

        Most people keep the resolution at the highest setting when capturing images since memory cards have such a great capacity today. You will probably always want to have a copy of your images at their highest resolution for better quality in printing and enlargement. 

        ISO Sensitivity - Keep at 200 or lower for higher quality images

        Sensitivity is a measure of how quickly the camera reacts to light. The higher the sensitivity, the less light needed to make an exposure. Although a high ISO rating is suitable for shooting pictures of subjects in action or in poor lighting, high sensitivity is often associated with “noise” — randomly spaced, brightly colored pixels concentrated in the dark parts of the image.

        White Balance - Set for the correct color of light 

        The color of the light reflected from an object varies with the color of the light source. The human brain is able to adapt to changes in the color of the light source, with the result that white objects appear white whether seen in the shade, direct sunlight, or under incandescent lighting. Digital cameras can mimic this adjustment of the human eye by processing images acceding to the color of the light source. This is known as “white balance.” For natural coloration, choose a white balance setting that matches the light source before shooting.  Although the default setting “Auto” can be used under most types of lighting, you can apply the white balance setting suited to a particular light source to achieve more accurate results.

        Shiny surfaces of three-dimensional works

        It is sometimes difficult to prevent strong washed-out highlights on shiny metallic surfaces. Try using the manual shooting mode to manually adjust the exposure. Also try distancing the light sources from the artwork to make the highlights less stark. If your camera doesn't have a manual setting, you are always welcome to make an appointment to use the School of Art and Design's cameras within the Visual Arts building.

      • Photographing Artwork For Your Digital Portfolio

        Equipment Needed:

        • Camera (A point-and-shoot version digital with high resolution—at least 5 megabytes)
        • Tripod
        • Large piece of grey or black paper (larger than the artwork) for use as background for 3-dimensional works

        Optional Equipment:

        • Tungsten lights
        • Softboxes or other light diffusion materials
        • Dark grey seamless paper – available through photo retailers 

        Instructions

        Method 1 – two-dimensional artwork - outdoor without lighting equipment

        1. Begin by choosing a well-lit but low-glare place to shoot—preferably in the shade or during an overcast day to avoid shadows and glare.

        2. Hang your artwork on a vertical surface with the center of the work facing out approximately at eye level.

        3. Measure the height to the center of the artwork using a tape measure.

        4. Set your camera on its tripod and use the height you just measured to adjust the height of the camera. Measure to the center of your lens.

        5. Your camera’s distance to the artwork should be determined by your lens’s angle of view. Be sure to fill as much of the image frame as is possible without cropping out any of the artwork.

        6. Examine the edges and corners of the art through the viewfinder to be sure there is no distortion or key stoning (when one side appears longer that a parallel side).

        7. Set your camera to its highest resolution setting and to its lowest ISO rating for the highest quality images possible.

        8. Set your camera to its manual, program, or aperture-priority setting (do not use "auto"). For proper exposure use a hand-held light meter. If this is not available use the photo grey card to take an in-camera light meter reading. Set your camera's aperture and shutter speed based upon your light meter reading.
          Note: As long as the light does not change significantly, this exposure will provide good results for each piece photographed. There is no need to re-meter. Please note that once the gray card is taken away, the meter may indicate overexposure or underexposure, particularly if the piece is predominantly dark or light. Do not make any changes. Continue using the reading from the gray card.

          Another way to rest assured that you get a good exposure is by bracketing. If you have manual exposure capability, this means that you can adjust the exposure up or down according the the camera's suggested meter reading.

          If you are using a point-and-shoot automatic-only camera, you may not have the option to change the exposure, causing some works to have off-balance color or values. On some auto-only cameras you can expose correctly by pointing focus crosshairs of the viewfinder on the area of the object for which want to expose the image and simultaneously half-way hold-down the shutter button as you redirect the camera to the composition you want. Then push the shutter button all the way down.
        9. Now you are ready to begin photographing your work.

        lighting

         

        Method 2 – two-dimensional artwork - indoor with lighting equipment

        Follow steps 2-8 from method 1 above then...

        1. Set up your lights. 

          For best results, whether using strobe lighting or high quality tungsten lighting, place lights at an equal distance from your artwork, at approximately 30º angles, being sure to avoid glare. The height of your lights should be on center with your artwork. 

        2. Now you are ready to begin photographing your work. 

         

        lighting

        lighting

         

        Method 3 - three-dimensional artwork – outdoor without lighting equipment

        1. Begin by choosing a well-lit but low-glare place to shoot. Preferably in the shade or during an overcast day.

        2. Place a table up against a wall. Use push pins or tape to attach neutral gray paper or fabric to the wall above the table, allowing it to sweep down covering the table. Make sure the paper/fabric arcs gently between the wall and the table.

        3. If the artwork is producing a lot of glare, the light may be diffused holding sheets of tracing paper or vellum in between the light and the subject. This will soften the light and prevent highlights. See also the tips section for more ideas.

        4. Set your camera on its tripod and adjust the height so it is at a low-enough angle to permit a direct view to the front, sides, and back of the work. Also be sure to level your camera using the bubble level to match your art.

        5. Your camera’s distance to the artwork should be determined by your lens’s angle of view. Use your artistic judgement to determine the amount of background space needed to properly display the movement of the work.

        6. Set your camera to its highest resolution setting and to its lowest ISO rating for the highest quality images possible.

        7. Use a hand-held light meter to achieve proper exposure. If not available use the photo grey card to take an in-camera light meter reading. Set your camera's aperture and shutter based upon your light meter reading. If you are using a point-and-shoot automatic-only camera, you may not have the option to change the exposure, causing some works to have off-balance color or values.

          Note: As long as the light does not change significantly, this exposure will provide good results for each piece photographed. There is no need to re-meter. Please note that once the gray card is taken away, the meter may indicate overexposure or underexposure, particularly if the piece is predominantly dark or light. Do not make any changes. Continue using the reading from the gray card.

          Another way to rest assured that you get a good exposure is by bracketing. If you have manual exposure capability, this means that you can adjust the exposure up or down according the the camera's suggested meter reading.

          If you are using a point-and-shoot automatic-only camera, you may not have the option to change the exposure, causing some works to have off-balance color or values. On some auto-only cameras you can expose correctly by pointing focus crosshairs of the viewfinder on the area of the object for which want to expose the image and simultaneously half-way hold-down the shutter button as you redirect the camera to the composition you want. Then push the shutter button all the way down.

        8. Now you are ready to begin photographing your work.

        lighting

         

        Method 4 -  three-dimensional artwork – indoor with lighting equipment

        1. Place a table up against a wall. Use push pins or tape to attach neutral gray paper or fabric to the wall above the table allowing it to sweep down covering the table. Make sure the paper/fabric arcs gently between the wall and the table.

        2. Place one light on the work as the main or "key" light preferably coming from and angle and from above. The second light should be further away from the subject to help fill in the shadows created by the first light on the opposite.

        3. Avoid creating distracting shadows on the background. 
          If the artwork is producing a lot of glare, the light may be diffused holding sheets of tracing paper or vellum in between the light and the subject. This will soften the light and prevent highlights. See also the tips section for more ideas.

        4. Set your camera on its tripod so the height of the camera is pointed directly into or slightly above the front, side, or back portions of the work. Also be sure to level your camera using the bubble level to match your art.

        5. Your camera’s distance to the artwork should be determined by your lens’s angle of view. Use your artistic judgement to determine the amount of background space needed to properly display the movement of the work.

        6. Set your camera to its highest resolution setting and to its lowest ISO rating for the highest quality images possible.

        7. Use a hand-held light meter to achieve proper exposure. If not available use the photo grey card to take an in-camera light meter reading. Set your camera's aperture and shutter based upon your light meter reading. If you are using a point-and-shoot automatic-only camera, you may not have the option to change the exposure, causing some works to have off-balance color or values.

          Note: As long as the light does not change significantly, this exposure will provide good results for each piece photographed. There is no need to re-meter. Please note that once the gray card is taken away, the meter may indicate overexposure or underexposure, particularly if the piece is predominantly dark or light. Do not make any changes. Continue using the reading from the gray card.

          Another way to rest assured that you get a good exposure is by bracketing. If you have manual exposure capability, this means that you can adjust the exposure up or down according the the camera's suggested meter reading.

          If you are using a point-and-shoot automatic-only camera, you may not have the option to change the exposure, causing some works to have off-balance color or values. On some auto-only cameras you can expose correctly by pointing focus crosshairs of the viewfinder on the area of the object for which want to expose the image and simultaneously half-way hold-down the shutter button as you redirect the camera to the composition you want. Then push the shutter button all the way down. 

        8. Now you are ready to begin photographing your work.

        lighting

        lighting

      •  

        Tips:

        Avoiding glare

        • Move lights to alternate positions changing the angle of reflection.
        • If shooting artwork that is showing a lot of reflection, use black paper or mat board to help eliminate the reflection.
        • If lights are causing glare, increase the angle of the lights or move further to the sides of the artwork until the reflection is no longer visible.
        • If available, the use of an overhead diffused light source (like a softbox) will greatly aid in photographing 3D works and help create a gradated background for your work.
        • The use of white foam board or mat board can greatly help in evening lighting with 3D works. Use these to help reflect the light onto your objects. This can even replace the use of your fill light.

        Color balance

        • Be sure that your light source and your camera are set up the same. If in daylight use the daylight color balance setting, tungsten light (like clamp lights or incandescent bulbs) requires a lower color balance setting at 3200ºk (tungsten). If using strobe lighting, your color balance should be daylight.

        Getting your digital images ready for submission

        • Image size and resolution.
        • Be sure to check the specifics required for the portfolio you are submitting to. Be sure not to submit an incorrect size, resolution, or file format. Some general rules of thumb for resolution are as follows:

          Professional printing 300 dpi
          Inkjet or lazer printers 150 dpi
          Powerpoint, PDF, or web presentations 72dpi
        • File format
        • While there are many formats the most common are jpeg and tiff. These are accepted and opened by the majority of computers and applications. Use these to be safe. Jpeg is the most common as it requires the least amount of disk space and can be shared the most easily.
        • As there are a countless number of image preparation applications, it would be to difficult to describe all of them and their functions, there are a few universal functions that will be applicable to you.
        • Crop – use this tool to cut away excess image or background that is unnecessary to describing your artwork. Adobe Photoshop has a "Perspective" attribute checkbox you can select to remove keystoning that may exist in the image of your two-dimensional artwork.
        • Resize – this allows you to set image size and resolution (again, check the specifics outlined in the portfolio).
        • Brightness and contrast – be careful with these and use with caution. These tools can ruin an otherwise acceptable image and once your’ve gone to far you can’t go back.. Your monitor may not be very accurate, if you have the ability to check numeric values of RGB (red, green and blue) be sure that your image highlights don’t exceed 245 and that your shadows don’t go below 15 for each of the colors.
        • Saving and naming your images
        • FOLDER: Save your files in a folder that is clearly labeled and easy to find on your disk. Double check once you burn your disk to be sure that all the images are there. You don’t want to be overlooked for a simple error.
        • FILENAME: Unless you are submitting images to be adjudicated anonymously (like for a juried exhibition), it is important to at least include your last name in the file name. You may also want to include an abbreviated title or descriptive keyword. Avoid using spaces and any non-alphanumeric characters except the _underscore and period.
        • METADATA: It is possible to embed into your digital images invisible text metadata that certain computer applications can read and write. This additional technology allows you to tag your image with your copyright, descriptive information, and many other types of information that identify the image with its creator. This, in addition to the file name, can be used to make sure your work is attributed to the correct person when it is copied on differtent systems. Adobe Bridge and Photoshop, as well as many other non-Adobe applications have this image metadata read/write capability. More information about this can be found at http://www.iptc.org/. Search for links to "Photo Metadata." Another place to get more information about this technology is http://metadatadeluxe.pbworks.com.
      • General Art and Design Terms

        Goals and Objectives: A statement of what an assignment or exercise is meant to achieve. An example in 2-D might be:  Goal or Objective- Create a composition that depicts "alienation" using one small circle, any number of large squares, expansive negative space and changes in value.

        Representational (Realism): A life-like image from our three-dimensional world that describes subject matter based on perceptive reality and visual observation.

        Nonobjective (Nonrepresentational): Images created with no reference to the natural world.

        Abstract (Stylized): Imagery derived from a natural visual source, but is transformed, exaggerated, simplified, or distorted.

        Value scale:  A series of graduated values from white to black.

        Cropping: The part of an image/segment of reality that is selected, and usually includes only the most significant information. 

        Design or Composition:  The combination of multiple parts into a harmonious whole using elements & principles of design. 

        Elements of Design

        Line: 
        1. A point or mark in motion;
        2. An implied connection. To create energy, a line must be longer than it is wide. 

        Shape: 
        1. A flat, enclosed area created by connecting lines;
        2. An area implied through boundaries defined by color, texture, value or directional variations.

        Form: (volume) 
        Actual or implied three-dimensional shapes. 

        Mass: 
        A solid three-dimensional form.

        Texture: 
        Surface quality (visual or tactile). 

        Value: 
        The relative lightness or darkness reflected from a surface. 

        Light: 
        A representation of, or the actual medium (as a window) through which visible illumination is admitted.

        Color: 
        Hue that is determined by reflected wavelengths of light. 

        Space: 
        The distance, or illusion of distance around or between objects 

        Time:
        An implied, elapsed, or actual period during which an action, process, or condition exists or continues. 

        Principles of Design

        Unity: 
        The oneness, or wholeness, in a design that occurs when all parts work together to create a cohesive whole. 

        Variety:
        A sense of differences or contrast between similar elements.

        Weight: 
        The visual or physical heaviness or lightness of an object. 

        Gravity:
        The force that pulls toward the center of the Earth, and also involves vertical/horizontal orientation.

        Balance: 
        The equal distribution of weight or force among interacting and/or opposing forces in a design. 

        Scale: 
        A size relationship between two separate objects (often our own human size). 

        Proportion:
        A comparative, or relative, relationship between the parts to a whole within one image. 

        Emphasis (Focal Point): 
        Special attention giving prominence to some aspect of a design. 

        Movement: 
        Visual pathways through space within the design.

        Repetition: 
        The recurrence of an element or effect used a number of times within a design.

        Rhythm: 
        An orderly recurrence of elements with variety

       

    If you have questions about credit for your high school's Advanced Placement courses in Art History, Two-dimensional Design, Three-dimensional Design, and Drawing, please see the "Frequently Asked Questions" link above.

    APPLY NOW

 

Sturgis Rare Book Room
Rare Book Room of the Sturgis Library.

Admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Art History 

There are no special requirements for admission to the art history major. Students may declare the major by filling out a form in the School of Art and Design Office, or by requesting it through Owl Express. Students should plan to begin their language study as early as possible.

Admission to the Upper Level Concentration (Current BFA Students only)

Once a student has completed the Lower-Division Major Requirements and while enrolled in the second course of their intended concentration area, they will submit a portfolio of work in that area for review by the supervising faculty. Students may apply to more than one concentration area, or apply to a second concentration later in their course of study. Admission into any concentration area is dependent upon the strength of the student’s portfolio, their performance in visual arts courses, and their overall academic performance in all classes taken.

Concentration Portfolio Submission Deadlines

(For all students in the second semester of the declared concentration ) 

November 13 (For Spring Term acceptance)
March 13 (For Fall Term acceptance) 

Portfolios submitted after 5 p.m. on these dates will not be reviewed until the next possible submission date. Approximately 3 weeks are required from the time we receive your portfolio to complete the review.

Steps for submitting your concentration portfolio:

Review the portfolio requirements for the concentration to which you are applying listed below. 

Click the "Apply Now” link to create your application to your upper-level concentration area.

Please note: this is the same application system used for the entrance portfolio; you can use your existing login information or create a new account.

When completing the application, be sure to indicate that you are applying for entrance to the upper-level concentration area and indicate you intended concentration. If you are interested in applying to more than one concentration area at the same time, contact ARCS_COTA@kennesaw.edu prior to submitting your application. 

APPLY NOW

  • Contact the Academic Resource Center for Students (ARCS) | 
    Room 209 of the Wilson Bldg. | 470-578-6614
    Samuel Robinson, Assistant Dean and Director, srobin50@kennesaw.edu
    Christine Collins, Associate Director, ccolli61@kennesaw.edu 

    Need help photographing your artwork? Please Email Shane McDonald at smcdona4@kennesaw.edu.

The portfolio requirements for the concentration areas are detailed below (click on the concentration name to reveal instructions):

  • Each application to the concentration in ceramics must include the following:

    1. A minimum of six pieces of work including the following:

    • Three using ceramics as the primary media
    • Three representing at least two other three-dimensional media
    • Each piece must have two images that best describe the piece in the round (six pieces - twelve images).
    • Students may submit additional works if they wish (up to 10 pieces)

    Images should be uploaded as JPEGs with height and width pixel dimensions no smallerthan 400 pixels and no larger than 2000 pixels. (Images should approximately fill the screen at a sharp resolution but not be so large to cause slower upload/download speed.) Ceramic works should be photographed with good lighting and a clean background -- preferably black from the top fading to gray at the bottom.

    2. An image inventory list in MS Word format that includes the following information:

    • Title of work
    • Dimensions (height, width and depth)
    • Medium
    • Year work was made

    If an artwork was created for a class assignment, applicants should indicate for which class it was created and write a brief description of the assignment; if it was not for a class, indicate it as an "original work."

     

  • Provide 11documents. Images (up to 5MB each) and PDF’s (up to 10MB each) Animation Files: MP4 using h.264 compression 

    Your Computer Animation portfolio should contain drawings, computer files, and examples of your major design work:

    Three drawings from Drawing II – ART 2150          

    Three projects from Computer Applications in Art – ART 2550

    Three animations from Foundation Animation – ANIM 3600

    Two images from Electronic Illustration – ART 3015

     

  •  Each application to the concentration in drawing and painting must include the following:

    1. Ten works total showing work from any drawing or painting coursework and personal/non-directed work 

    Images should be uploaded as JPEGs with height and width pixel dimensions no smaller than 400 pixels and no larger than 2000 pixels. (Images should approximately fill the screen at a sharp resolution but not be so large to cause slower upload/download speed.) The work should be photographed with good lighting and cropped to the image. If work is not rectangular, please make background gray, black, or white without distracting elements.

    2. Artist’s Statement in MS Word format

    3. An image inventory list in MS Word format that includes the following information:

    • Title of work
    • Dimensions (height, width—and depth for 3-D works)
      Medium
    • Year work was made

    If an artwork was created for a class assignment, applicants should indicate for which class it was created and write a brief description of the assignment; if it was not for a class, indicate it as an "original work."

  • Each application to the concentration in graphic communications must include the following:

    1. Images MUST be saved at a resolution of 72 dpi, in one PDF file no larger than 15MB (see Description of Images below)

    • Include a title page with your name, year and semester, and the portfolio title.
    • Image dimensions must be no larger than 1024 x 768 ppi and no smaller than 800 x 600 ppi.
    • Description of images in your portfolio PDF (letter size page)

    2. Artistic Statement in a letter-sized PDF or in MS Word format. Include an explanation of why you are applying for the BFA in the graphic communications concentration.

    * Transfered students should meet with their adviser to determine readiness for portfolio submission.

    Description of Images

    • Three of your best drawings
    • Five of your best projects from Computer Application in Art as follows:
      2 raster graphics
      2 vector graphics
      1 combination of raster and vector graphics
    • Four of your best pieces from Typography I
    • All work from Typography II completed to date must be included in the portfolio

    Note: 

    • All work must have been completed within the last 4 semesters
    • Passing Typography II does not guarantee acceptance into the concentration. The next course in the concentration is Publication Design, but you must be accepted into the concentration to register for this course.

  • Each application to the concentration in photography must include the following:

    1. Artist Statement in an MS Word document

    2. Artist Curriculum Vita (resumé) in an MS Word document

    3. Twenty examples of Photographic Works

    Images should be uploaded as JPEGs with height and width pixel dimensions no smallerthan 400 pixels and no larger than 2000 pixels. (Images should approximately fill the screen at a sharp resolution but not be so large to cause slower upload/download speed.)

    This work should represent, though is not limited to; assignments from previous photography courses, current work and any personal projects.

    • 5 examples of black and white photography printed traditionally from film and darkroom techniques 
    • 5 examples of color photography
    • 5 examples of medium format camera use
    • 5 additional images of your choice


    Portfolios will be evaluated based on the following criteria: Conceptual Inventiveness

    • Content
    • Composition and Framing
    • Print/Image Quality
    • Presentation
    • Technique
    • Writing Skill
  • Each application to the concentration in printmaking must include the following:

    1. Current Resumé in MS Word format

    2. Artist statement in MS Word format

    3. Up to twenty pieces of your strongest works that show skill in 2-Dimensional Design, Drawing, and Printmaking I

    This work should represent, though is not limited to; assignments from all 2-dimensional media including drawing, painting, photography, digital design, and printmaking. Images should be uploaded as JPEGs with height and width pixel dimensions no smaller than 400 pixels and no larger than 2000 pixels. (Images should approximately fill the screen at a sharp resolution but not be so large to cause slower upload/download speed.)

    4. An image inventory list in MS Word format that includes the following information:

    • Title
    • Medium 
    • Size 
    • Year work was made

    Portfolios will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

    • Craftmanship 
    • Composition and Framing 
    • Print/Image Quality (view tips on taking good photographs of your artwork) 
    • Presentation 
    • Skill level/Technique 
    • Writing Skills/clarity of personal vision
  • Each application to the concentration in sculpture must include the following:

    1. A typed statement in a MS Word format of no more that 300 words indicating why the student is interested in becoming a sculpture major and what the student plans to do with a studio background in sculpture. 

    2. Six examples of works of sculpture. Two of these should be identified as completed outside of a formal class. Images of functional ceramic vessels are not acceptable. 

    • A minimum of three different media should be represented among the six examples.
    • Two views of each image are required. An additional "detail" image may be submitted where particular details are not seen in the other full-view images. 

    Images should be uploaded as JPEGs with height and width pixel dimensions no smallerthan 400 pixels and no larger than 2000 pixels. (Images should approximately fill the screen at a sharp resolution but not be so large to cause slower upload/download speed.) Sculpture works should be photographed with good lighting and a clean background -- preferably black from the top fading to gray at the bottom. 

    3. An image inventory list in MS Word that includes the following information for each work: 

    •  Title (titles are italicized, not put in quotation marks)
    • Dimensions (height, width—and depth for 3-D works) 
    • Medium 
    • Year work was made

    If an artwork was created for a class assignment, applicants should indicate for which class it was created and write a brief description of the assignment; if it was not for a class, indicate it as an "original work."

     

art education
"ART Education 6200 Camp" from the MAT in Teaching Art

Admission to our Master of Arts in Teaching Art

Students interested in applying to the Master of Arts in Teaching Art must complete an application to the graduate school and submit a portfolio of photographic images of your artwork. The MAT Art degree is based on the Comprehensive Arts Education model, focusing on the areas of production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. The program is also aligned with the standards defined by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). Thus, the portfolio should reflect art competencies in various media.  

  • Content

    The portfolio is composed of photographic images of your artwork. A total of twenty still images and/or moving images should be submitted. The MAT Art degree is based on the Comprehensive Arts Education model, focusing on the areas of production, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics. The program is also aligned with the five standards defined by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) as recognized in Rule 505-3-.11 Art Education Program in the State of Georgia. Thus, the portfolio should reflect art competencies in various media including but not limited to: drawing, painting, photography, graphic design, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, computer images, models, mechanical drawings, or any other art work.

    Format

    Portfolios should be submitted as Powerpoint files. The file name should be the candidate’s name, last name first (“Smith Jane.ppt”). Images should be of high enough resolution to be crisp and clear. Poor image quality will negatively affect the evaluation of your portfolio. Standard 4x3 page setup is preferred, and background color should be black. Any moving images should use a commonly available player and be embedded in the Powerpoint file and should be no longer than two minutes.

    All submissions must be on a CD or DVD that is Macintosh-readable. Disks should be sent in paper sleeves with your name legibly printed on the disks, the sleeves, and the envelope. If you would like your CDs or DVDs returned, you must include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Portfolios without self-addressed, stamped envelopes will be held for 1 year after notification. If still unclaimed, the portfolio will be discarded.

    Labeling

    Each Powerpoint “slide” should be labeled at the bottom or left side in white 12-point Arial with the following information. Do NOT include your name with the individual images.

    • Title (titles are italicized, not put in quotation marks) 
    • Dimensions (height, width--and depth for 3-D works) 
    • Medium (only if the medium of the original work is photography should it be listed as such)
    • Year work was made

    Examples:

    Untitled Figure Study 
    18 X 24 in.
    Charcoal on newsprint 
    2013 

    Montana Plains 
    8 X 10 in.
    Photography--film negative, digital print 
    2014

    Untitled 
    10 X 8 X 12 ft.
    Sculptural installation--steel, wire screen, & electronics 
    2014

    Working with Time 
    960 x 720 ppi video, 2 minutes duration
    Digital video—mp4 
    2015

    Glass Bottle Study 
    16 X 20 in.
    Oil on canvas
    2014

    Anna Goodwin 
    12” X 16” 
    Pencil on paper 
    2014

    Evaluation Criteria

    The portfolio review committee has determined that the following criteria be used to review portfolios:

    • Composition – Emphasis, focal point, eye movement, and balance
    • Craftsmanship – Basic fine motor skill and attention to detail
    • Conceptual Inventiveness – Effort to communicate and creativity

    Each of these criteria will be assigned a value from the list below by the faculty reviewer:

    • Excellent – roughly equivalent to an A (4.0) grade
    • Good – roughly equivalent to a B (3.0) grade
    • Adequate – roughly equivalent to a C (2.0) grade
    • Weak – roughly equivalent to a D (1.0) grade
    • None – used if evidence of criteria is not evident or applicable

      The Art Education Admission Committee will use this information in making the final decision regarding whether an applicant will be accepted as a MAT Art candidate.

HALLWAY CRITIQUE 

Scholarships

There are many need- and merit-based scholarships available to student in the School of Art & Design. You can do a category search in the university’s scholarship application to determine if you meet any of the criteria for these awards. When you are ready, you can begin your scholarship application by going to the KSU Scholarships Home Page or through the Owl Express Financial Aid menu.

  • Before you begin your application, make sure that you have the following:

    • A complete list of your extra-curricular activities, volunteer activities, and any awards or recognitions you have received

    • Email addresses for any letters of recommendation you would like to submit

    • Be prepared to upload the following:
    • BFA: A PowerPoint portfolio of digital images of 10 of your strongest works
    • BAT Textiles and Apparel: Students will need to write a statement about their career aspirations relating to the business of the textiles industry.  They should also submit a portfolio of design works that exhibits technical and creative skills.
    • Art Education: A PowerPoint portfolio of digital images of 10 of your strongest works. Focus your written statements to emphasize how your work will contribute to your plans as a future art educator.
    • Art History: Submit a sample writing or research paper that exemplifies your best academic work

    You should also be sure to review the information on the scholarship FAQ page before beginning your application. Your writing skills will be a part of the evaluation process. Check your essays for spelling and grammatical errors before submitting. Help with this is available at the Academic Resource Center for Students in the College of the Arts.

    If awarded a scholarship, you will be notified by the Assistant Dean of the College of the Arts by Email to your KSU students email account only. You will also receive notification from the KSU Scholarship Office. 

 KSU Scholarships web site

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